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Article

Dependence of Socio-Emotional Competence Expression on Gender and Grade for K5–K12 Students

1
Faculty of Human and Social Studies, Mykolas Romeris University, 08303 Vilnius, Lithuania
2
Institute of Education, Vilnius University Šiauliai Academy, 76352 Šiauliai, Lithuania
3
Department of Physics, University of Girona, 17003 Girona, Spain
4
Institute of Sciences Education, University of Girona, 17003 Girona, Spain
5
Department of Specific Didactics, University of Girona, 17004 Girona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Colleen McLaughlin
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(5), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12050341
Received: 2 March 2022 / Revised: 28 April 2022 / Accepted: 9 May 2022 / Published: 12 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Emotional Education in Schools)
Socio-emotional education is referred to as the missing part that links academic knowledge to successes in school, family, community, workplace, and life. Socio-emotional education, in conjunction with academic instruction, aims to lay the groundwork for a sound moral education. This manuscript is aimed at proving that socio-emotional education may improve children’s mental health. In total, 1322 students (of grades K5–K12) participated in this study back in October 2020. A statistically validated and partially modified questionnaire according to The Limbic Performance Indicators™ (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.92, p < 0.000) was used to assess general education school students’ social–emotional competencies. The study uses an abbreviated version of the questionnaire adapted by the Lithuanian Association of Social Emotional Education, which has been adapted with the consent of the selected age group. As a result, this study explores how to determine general education school students’ knowledge and skills in socio-emotional education while also identifying the best pedagogical approaches to addressing socio-emotional education. According to research findings, students that participated in the study displayed more personal values, respect for others, internal balance, collaboration, emotional perception of others, or basic emotional needs. Personal values, respect for others, emotional perception of others, internal balance, support, and basic emotional needs were estimated to be greater in the target group of girls than in the target group of boys. View Full-Text
Keywords: socio-emotional competence; level of study; age; gender differences socio-emotional competence; level of study; age; gender differences
MDPI and ACS Style

Butvilas, T.; Bubnys, R.; Colomer, J.; Cañabate, D. Dependence of Socio-Emotional Competence Expression on Gender and Grade for K5–K12 Students. Educ. Sci. 2022, 12, 341. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12050341

AMA Style

Butvilas T, Bubnys R, Colomer J, Cañabate D. Dependence of Socio-Emotional Competence Expression on Gender and Grade for K5–K12 Students. Education Sciences. 2022; 12(5):341. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12050341

Chicago/Turabian Style

Butvilas, Tomas, Remigijus Bubnys, Jordi Colomer, and Dolors Cañabate. 2022. "Dependence of Socio-Emotional Competence Expression on Gender and Grade for K5–K12 Students" Education Sciences 12, no. 5: 341. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12050341

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