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Open AccessArticle

Implications of Assessing Student-Driven Projects: A Case Study of Possible Challenges and an Argument for Reflexivity

by Sofie Pedersen 1,* and Mads Hobye 2
1
Social Psychology of Everyday Life, Department of People & Technology, Roskilde University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
2
Computer Science, Department of People & Technology, Roskilde University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10010019
Received: 8 November 2019 / Revised: 19 December 2019 / Accepted: 6 January 2020 / Published: 8 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Problem-based Pedagogies in Higher Education)
Employing student-driven project work in a higher education setting challenges not only the way in which we understand students’ learning and how we define the expected learning outcomes, it also challenges our ways of assessing students’ learning. This paper will address this question specifically and illustrate with a case that highlights some of the challenges that may arise in practice when assessing student-driven, problem-based projects. The case involved an assessment situation in which a discrepancy arose between the internal and external examiner in relation to what was valued. The discrepancy had consequences not only for the concrete assessment of students’ work, but also for the validity of the problem-based university pedagogy in general, and it raised the question of how to assess students’ work adequately. The research focus of this study was to explore the implications of assessing student-driven projects within a progressive approach to higher education teaching, along with the potential underlying issues. We found a need for clear assessment criteria while insisting on a space for students’ creativity and reflexivity as essential parts of a learning process. The paper thus makes a case for the notion of reflexivity as an assessment criterion to be integrated into learning objectives. View Full-Text
Keywords: assessment; reflexivity; problem-oriented project work; student-driven projects assessment; reflexivity; problem-oriented project work; student-driven projects
MDPI and ACS Style

Pedersen, S.; Hobye, M. Implications of Assessing Student-Driven Projects: A Case Study of Possible Challenges and an Argument for Reflexivity. Educ. Sci. 2020, 10, 19.

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