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Article

Effectiveness and Feasibility of Pharmacist-Driven Penicillin Allergy De-Labeling Pilot Program without Skin Testing or Oral Challenges

Department of Pharmacy, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Mail Route 11321, 800 East 28th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55407, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Kayla R. Stover, Katie E. Barber and Jamie L. Wagner
Pharmacy 2021, 9(3), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9030127
Received: 26 June 2021 / Revised: 13 July 2021 / Accepted: 16 July 2021 / Published: 20 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Antimicrobial Use in Hospitalized Patients)
Documented penicillin allergies have been associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. The goal of this project was to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of a pharmacist-led penicillin allergy “de-labeling” process that does not involve labor-intensive skin testing or direct oral challenges. Adult patients with penicillin allergies were identified and interviewed by an infectious diseases pharmacy resident during a 3-month pilot period. Using an evidence-based standardized checklist, the pharmacist determined if an allergy qualified for de-labeling. In total, 66 patients were interviewed during the pilot period. The average time spent was 5.2 min per patient interviewed. Twelve patients (18%) met the criteria for de-labeling and consented to the removal of the allergy. Four patients (6%) met the criteria but declined removal of the allergy. In brief, 58.3% of patients (7/12) who were de-labeled and 50% of patients (2/4) who declined de-labeling but had their allergy updated to reflect intolerance were subsequently prescribed beta-lactam antibiotics and all (9/9, 100%) were able to tolerate these agents. A pharmacist-led penicillin allergy de-labeling process utilizing a standardized checklist is an effective and feasible method for removing penicillin allergies in patients without a true allergy. View Full-Text
Keywords: penicillins; hypersensitivity; pharmacists; Antimicrobial Stewardship; pharmacy services; allergy penicillins; hypersensitivity; pharmacists; Antimicrobial Stewardship; pharmacy services; allergy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Song, Y.-C.; Nelson, Z.J.; Wankum, M.A.; Gens, K.D. Effectiveness and Feasibility of Pharmacist-Driven Penicillin Allergy De-Labeling Pilot Program without Skin Testing or Oral Challenges. Pharmacy 2021, 9, 127. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9030127

AMA Style

Song Y-C, Nelson ZJ, Wankum MA, Gens KD. Effectiveness and Feasibility of Pharmacist-Driven Penicillin Allergy De-Labeling Pilot Program without Skin Testing or Oral Challenges. Pharmacy. 2021; 9(3):127. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9030127

Chicago/Turabian Style

Song, You-Chan, Zachary J. Nelson, Michael A. Wankum, and Krista D. Gens 2021. "Effectiveness and Feasibility of Pharmacist-Driven Penicillin Allergy De-Labeling Pilot Program without Skin Testing or Oral Challenges" Pharmacy 9, no. 3: 127. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9030127

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