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Looking Ahead to 2030: Survey of Evolving Needs in Pharmacy Education

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School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
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Sol Price School of Public Policy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jeffrey Atkinson
Pharmacy 2021, 9(1), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9010059
Received: 16 February 2021 / Revised: 15 March 2021 / Accepted: 15 March 2021 / Published: 17 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Pharmacy Education and Student/Practitioner Training)
In order to keep pharmacy education relevant to a rapidly-evolving future, this study sought to identify key insights from leaders from a broad array of pharmacy and non-pharmacy industries on the future of the pharmacy profession, pharmaceutical sciences, and pharmacy education. Thought leaders representing a variety of industries were surveyed regarding their perspectives on the future of pharmacy practice, pharmaceutical science disciplines, and pharmacy education in seven domains. From 46 completed surveys, top challenges/threats were barriers that limit clinical practice opportunities, excessive supply of pharmacists, and high drug costs. Major changes in the drug distribution system, automation/robotics, and new therapeutic approaches were identified as the top technological disrupters. Key drivers of pharmacy education included the primary care provider shortage, growing use of technology and data, and rising drug costs. The most significant sources of job growth outside of retail and hospital settings were managed care organizations, technology/biotech/pharmaceutical companies, and ambulatory care practices. Needs in the industry included clinical management of complex patients, leadership and management, pharmaceutical scientists, and implementation science. Knowledge gaps were pharmacists not recognizing their value on the health care team, preparation to embrace and lead change, and expertise in data science and analytics. Pharmacy schools will need to address several disruptive trends to future-proof their curricula, including expanding patient management skills, leadership and management training, technology, and data analytics. View Full-Text
Keywords: education; forecasting; curriculum education; forecasting; curriculum
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MDPI and ACS Style

Papadopoulos, V.; Goldman, D.; Wang, C.; Keller, M.; Chen, S. Looking Ahead to 2030: Survey of Evolving Needs in Pharmacy Education. Pharmacy 2021, 9, 59. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9010059

AMA Style

Papadopoulos V, Goldman D, Wang C, Keller M, Chen S. Looking Ahead to 2030: Survey of Evolving Needs in Pharmacy Education. Pharmacy. 2021; 9(1):59. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9010059

Chicago/Turabian Style

Papadopoulos, Vassilios, Dana Goldman, Clay Wang, Michele Keller, and Steven Chen. 2021. "Looking Ahead to 2030: Survey of Evolving Needs in Pharmacy Education" Pharmacy 9, no. 1: 59. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9010059

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