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Open AccessCommentary

Opposition to Pharmacist Contraception Services: Evidence for Rebuttal

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College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Butler University, Indianapolis, IN 46208, USA
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Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Butler University, Indianapolis, IN 46208, USA
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School of Pharmacy, Wingate University, Wingate, NC 28174, USA
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National Association of State Pharmacy Associations, North Chesterfield, VA 23235, USA
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Birth Control Pharmacist, San Diego, CA 92122, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2020, 8(4), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8040176
Received: 25 August 2020 / Revised: 19 September 2020 / Accepted: 21 September 2020 / Published: 23 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist Contraception Services)
Pharmacist contraception services are growing across the United States. Several states have authorized pharmacists to prescribe contraception, and the interest in other states continues to grow. Opposition to these practices exists and centers on discussions related to safety, training, cost, and fragmentation of care. We review these arguments and provide evidence refuting these concerns. Pharmacist-prescribed contraception increases access to care, and patients express interest in utilizing this service at the pharmacy. Pharmacists follow evidence-based recommendations. Counseling on preventative services and referral to other providers is part of contraception care by pharmacists. Training programs have been developed to equip both pharmacy students and pharmacists with the knowledge, skills, and tools needed to successfully provide these services. This article can serve as a guide for pharmacists and advocates when discussing pharmacist-prescribed contraception with policymakers, patients, and other healthcare professionals. View Full-Text
Keywords: contraception; birth control; pharmacist; public health services; contraception access; pharmacist prescribing; contraception services; birth control pharmacy contraception; birth control; pharmacist; public health services; contraception access; pharmacist prescribing; contraception services; birth control pharmacy
MDPI and ACS Style

Mitchell, M.; Stauffenberg, C.; Vernon, V.; Mospan, C.M.; Shipman, A.J.; Rafie, S. Opposition to Pharmacist Contraception Services: Evidence for Rebuttal. Pharmacy 2020, 8, 176.

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