Next Article in Journal
Implementation and Effectiveness of an Interprofessional Support Program for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Swiss Primary Care: A Study Protocol
Previous Article in Journal
Pharmacy Education; Competency and Beyond
Previous Article in Special Issue
Attitudes of Michigan Female College Students about Pharmacists Prescribing Birth Control in a Community Pharmacy
Open AccessArticle

Emergency Contraception Access and Counseling in Urban Pharmacies: A Comparison between States with and without Pharmacist Prescribing

1
College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605, USA
2
Birth Control Pharmacist, San Diego, CA 92122, USA
3
Department of Pharmacy, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, CA 92103, USA
4
Department of Pharmacy, West Texas VA Health Care System, Big Spring, TX 79720, USA
5
Department of Pharmacy, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2020, 8(2), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8020105
Received: 18 May 2020 / Revised: 16 June 2020 / Accepted: 17 June 2020 / Published: 19 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist Contraception Services)
Pharmacists are often the primary source of emergency contraception (EC) access and patient information. This study aims to identify differences in pharmacist-reported EC access and counseling between states which do or do not permit pharmacist-prescribed EC. This prospective, mystery caller study was completed in California (CA), which permits pharmacist-prescribed EC after completion of continuing education, and Georgia (GA), which does not. All community pharmacies that were open to the public in San Diego and San Francisco, CA, and Atlanta, GA were called by researchers who posed as adult females inquiring about EC via a structured script. Primary endpoints were EC availability and counseling. Statistical analyses completed with SPSS. Researchers called 395 pharmacies, 98.2% were reached and included. Regarding levonorgestrel (LNG), CA pharmacists more frequently discussed (CA 90.4% vs. GA 81.2%, p = 0.02), stocked (CA 89.5% vs. GA 67.8%, p < 0.01), and correctly indicated it “will work” or “will work but may be less effective” 4 days after intercourse (CA 67.5% vs. GA 17.5%, p < 0.01). Ulipristal was infrequently discussed (CA 22.6% vs. GA 3.4%, p < 0.01) and rarely stocked (CA 9.6% vs. GA 0.7%, p < 0.01). Pharmacists practicing in states which permit pharmacist-prescribed EC with completion of required continuing education may be associated with improved patient access to oral EC and more accurate patient counseling. View Full-Text
Keywords: emergency contraception; levonorgestrel; ulipristal; contraception; hormonal contraception; counseling; medication access; pharmacist prescribing; pharmacist scope emergency contraception; levonorgestrel; ulipristal; contraception; hormonal contraception; counseling; medication access; pharmacist prescribing; pharmacist scope
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Stone, R.H.; Rafie, S.; Ernest, D.; Scutt, B. Emergency Contraception Access and Counseling in Urban Pharmacies: A Comparison between States with and without Pharmacist Prescribing. Pharmacy 2020, 8, 105.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop