Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Attitudes towards Turkish and Turks in Austria: From Guestworkers to “Quasi-Foreigners” in a Changing Social Landscape
Previous Article in Journal
Regular and Irregular Inflection in Different Groups of Bilingual Children and the Role of Verbal Short-Term and Verbal Working Memory
Open AccessArticle

Navigating the London-French Transnational Space: The Losses and Gains of Language as Embodied and Embedded Symbolic Capital

School of Humanities, University of Westminster, London W1B 2HW, UK
Languages 2021, 6(1), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6010057
Received: 4 February 2021 / Revised: 11 March 2021 / Accepted: 16 March 2021 / Published: 22 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multilingualism in Migrant Contexts)
In this article, an interdisciplinary lens is applied to French migrants’ reflections on their everyday language practices, investigating how embodied and embedded language, such as accent and London-French translanguaging, serve as both in-group and out-group symbolic markers in different transnational spaces. Key sociological concepts developed by Pierre Bourdieu are deployed, including field, habitus, hysteresis and symbolic capital, to assess the varying symbolic conversion rates of the migrants’ languaging practices across transnational spaces. A mixed-methodological and analytical approach is taken, combining narratives from ethnographic interviews and autobiography. Based on the data gathered, the article posits that the French accent is an embodied symbolic marker, experienced as an internalised dialectic: a barrier to inclusion/belonging in London and an escape from the symbolic weight of the originary accent in France. Subsequently, it argues that the migrants’ translanguaging functions as a spontaneous insider vernacular conducive to community identity construction in the postmigration space, but (mis)interpreted as an exclusionary articulation of symbolic distinction in the premigration context. Finally, the article asks whether participants’ linguistic repertoires, self-identifications and spatialities go beyond the notion of the ‘cleft habitus’, or even hybridity, to a post-structural, translanguaging third space that transcends borders. View Full-Text
Keywords: symbolic capital; linguistic habitus; cleft habitus; hysteresis; translanguaging; London French; in-group vernacular; accent; othering; third space symbolic capital; linguistic habitus; cleft habitus; hysteresis; translanguaging; London French; in-group vernacular; accent; othering; third space
MDPI and ACS Style

Huc-Hepher, S. Navigating the London-French Transnational Space: The Losses and Gains of Language as Embodied and Embedded Symbolic Capital. Languages 2021, 6, 57. https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6010057

AMA Style

Huc-Hepher S. Navigating the London-French Transnational Space: The Losses and Gains of Language as Embodied and Embedded Symbolic Capital. Languages. 2021; 6(1):57. https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6010057

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huc-Hepher, Saskia. 2021. "Navigating the London-French Transnational Space: The Losses and Gains of Language as Embodied and Embedded Symbolic Capital" Languages 6, no. 1: 57. https://doi.org/10.3390/languages6010057

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop