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Open AccessArticle

Nonstandard Use of the “Reflexive” Affix -sja in Russian Speech of Bilingual Speakers of Northern Siberia and the Russian Far East

1
Institute of Linguistics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 bld. 1 Bolshoi Kislovsky lane, 125009 Moscow, Russia
2
Lomovosov Moscow State University, GSP-1, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow, Russia
3
Vinogradov Russian Language Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Volkhonka str., 18/2, 119019 Moscow, Russia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Languages 2019, 4(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4020039
Received: 16 May 2019 / Revised: 14 June 2019 / Accepted: 14 June 2019 / Published: 17 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Formal and Methodological Approaches to Applied Linguistics)
One of the features of the oral Russian speech of bilingual speakers of the indigenous languages of Russia is the omission/the overuse of the “reflexive” affix -sja (a “middle voice” marker with a wide range of uses including reflexive, reciprocal, anticausative, passive, and some others). We discuss the data on the nonstandard use of -sja in the Russian speech of bilingual speakers of two language groups that differ both from Russian and from each other in this grammatical domain: Samoyedic (Forest Enets, Nganasan, and Nenets) and Tungusic (Nanai and Ulch). The data come from the corpus of contact-influenced Russian speech, which is being created by our team. We show that the mismatches in standard and nonstandard usage cannot be explained by direct structural copying from the donor language (indigenous) to the recipient one (the local variety of Russian). Nor is there a consistent system which differs from standard Russian since there are many more usages that follow the rules of standard Russian. The influence of the indigenous languages explains some overuses and omissions; the others can be explained by other factors, e.g., difficulties in the acquisition of verb pairs with non-transparent semantic or syntactic relations. View Full-Text
Keywords: bilingualism; language contact; pattern borrowing; Russian; Samoyedic languages; Tungusic languages; reflexive; valency changing; middle voice bilingualism; language contact; pattern borrowing; Russian; Samoyedic languages; Tungusic languages; reflexive; valency changing; middle voice
MDPI and ACS Style

Khomchenkova, I.; Pleshak, P.; Stoynova, N. Nonstandard Use of the “Reflexive” Affix -sja in Russian Speech of Bilingual Speakers of Northern Siberia and the Russian Far East. Languages 2019, 4, 39.

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