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Open AccessReview

Selective Laser Melting of Aluminum and Titanium Matrix Composites: Recent Progress and Potential Applications in the Aerospace Industry

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7, Canada
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Aerospace 2020, 7(6), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7060077
Received: 21 May 2020 / Revised: 3 June 2020 / Accepted: 9 June 2020 / Published: 11 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Additive Manufacturing for Aerospace and Defence)
Selective laser melting (SLM) is a near-net-shape time- and cost-effective manufacturing technique, which can create strong and efficient components with potential applications in the aerospace industry. To meet the requirements of the growing aerospace industrial demands, lighter materials with enhanced mechanical properties are of the utmost need. Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are extraordinary engineering materials with tailorable properties, bilaterally benefiting from the desired properties of reinforcement and matrix constituents. Among a wide range of MMCs currently available, aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) and titanium matrix composites (TMCs) are highly potential candidates for aerospace applications owing to their outstanding strength-to-weight ratio. However, the feasibility of SLM-fabricated composites utilization in aerospace applications is still challenging. This review addresses the SLM of AMCs/TMCs by considering the processability (densification level) and microstructural evolutions as the most significant factors determining the mechanical properties of the final part. The mechanical properties of fabricated MMCs are assessed in terms of hardness, tensile/compressive strength, ductility, and wear resistance, and are compared to their monolithic states. The knowledge gained from process–microstructure–mechanical properties relationship investigations can pave the way to make the existing materials better and invent new materials compatible with growing aerospace industrial demands. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerospace; additive manufacturing (AM); selective laser melting (SLM); aluminum matrix composites (AMCs); titanium matrix composites (TMCs); in-situ/ex-situ reinforced composites; mechanical properties aerospace; additive manufacturing (AM); selective laser melting (SLM); aluminum matrix composites (AMCs); titanium matrix composites (TMCs); in-situ/ex-situ reinforced composites; mechanical properties
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fereiduni, E.; Ghasemi, A.; Elbestawi, M. Selective Laser Melting of Aluminum and Titanium Matrix Composites: Recent Progress and Potential Applications in the Aerospace Industry. Aerospace 2020, 7, 77.

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