Next Article in Journal
The Impacts of Climate Change on Road Traffic Accidents in Saudi Arabia
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Defining Crop–Climate Departure in West Africa: Improved Understanding of the Timing of Future Changes in Crop Suitability
Open AccessArticle

Assessing Future Spatio-Temporal Changes in Crop Suitability and Planting Season over West Africa: Using the Concept of Crop-Climate Departure

Climate System Analysis Group (CSAG), Department of Environmental and Geographical Science, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7701 Cape Town, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Climate 2019, 7(9), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7090102
Received: 16 July 2019 / Revised: 15 August 2019 / Accepted: 20 August 2019 / Published: 24 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agriculture for Climate Change Adaptation)
The changing climate is posing significant threats to agriculture, the most vulnerable sector, and the main source of livelihood in West Africa. This study assesses the impact of the climate-departure on the crop suitability and planting month over West Africa. We used 10 CMIP5 Global climate models bias-corrected simulations downscaled by the CORDEX regional climate model, RCA4 to drive the crop suitability model, Ecocrop. We applied the concept of the crop-climate departure (CCD) to evaluate future changes in the crop suitability and planting month for five crop types, cereals, legumes, fruits, root and tuber and horticulture over the historical and future months. Our result shows a reduction (negative linear correlation) and an expansion (positive linear correlation) in the suitable area and crop suitability index value in the Guinea-Savanna and Sahel (southern Sahel) zone, respectively. The horticulture crop was the most negatively affected with a decrease in the suitable area while cereals and legumes benefited from the expansion in suitable areas into the Sahel zone. In general, CCD would likely lead to a delay in the planting season by 2–4 months except for the orange and early planting dates by about 2–3 months for cassava. No projected changes in the planting month are observed for the plantain and pineapple which are annual crops. The study is relevant for a short and long-term adaptation option and planning for future changes in the crop suitability and planting month to improve food security in the region. View Full-Text
Keywords: crop-climate departure; Ecocrop; crop suitability; planting month; CORDEX; West Africa crop-climate departure; Ecocrop; crop suitability; planting month; CORDEX; West Africa
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Egbebiyi, T.S.; Lennard, C.; Crespo, O.; Mukwenha, P.; Lawal, S.; Quagraine, K. Assessing Future Spatio-Temporal Changes in Crop Suitability and Planting Season over West Africa: Using the Concept of Crop-Climate Departure. Climate 2019, 7, 102.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop