Next Article in Journal
The Indian Ocean Dipole: A Missing Link between El Niño Modokiand Tropical Cyclone Intensity in the North Indian Ocean
Previous Article in Journal
Observed Spatiotemporal Trends in Intense Precipitation Events across United States: Applications for Stochastic Weather Generation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Relationship between East Asian Cold Surges and Synoptic Patterns: A New Coupling Framework
Open AccessArticle

Not so Normal Normals: Species Distribution Model Results are Sensitive to Choice of Climate Normals and Model Type

1
U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, Fort Collins, CO 80526, USA
2
Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Climate 2019, 7(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7030037
Received: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 23 February 2019 / Published: 28 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate and Climate Niche Models)
Species distribution models have many applications in conservation and ecology, and climate data are frequently a key driver of these models. Often, correlative modeling approaches are developed with readily available climate data; however, the impacts of the choice of climate normals is rarely considered. Here, we produced species distribution models for five disparate species using four different modeling algorithms and compared results between two different, but overlapping, climate normals time periods. Although the correlation structure among climate predictors did not change between the time periods, model results were sensitive to both baseline climate period and model method, even with model parameters specifically tuned to a species. Each species and each model type had at least one difference in variable retention or relative ranking with the change in climate time period. Pairwise comparisons of spatial predictions were also different, ranging from a low of 1.6% for climate period differences to a high of 25% for algorithm differences. While uncertainty from model algorithm selection is recognized as an important source of uncertainty, the impact of climate period is not commonly assessed. These uncertainties may affect conservation decisions, especially when projecting to future climates, and should be evaluated during model development. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate; correlative models; habitat suitability; software for assisted habitat modeling; uncertainty climate; correlative models; habitat suitability; software for assisted habitat modeling; uncertainty
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Jarnevich, C.S.; Young, N.E. Not so Normal Normals: Species Distribution Model Results are Sensitive to Choice of Climate Normals and Model Type. Climate 2019, 7, 37.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop