Next Article in Journal
Solving Multi-Objective Problems for Multifunctional and Sustainable Management in Maritime Pine Forest Landscapes
Previous Article in Journal
A Proposal to Evaluate Drought Characteristics Using Multiple Climate Models for Multiple Timescales
Previous Article in Special Issue
Possible Scenarios of Winter Wheat Yield Reduction of Dryland Qazvin Province, Iran, Based on Prediction of Temperature and Precipitation Till the End of the Century
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperPerspective
Climate 2018, 6(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli6040080

New Breeding Techniques for Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation: Plants May Express Nitrous Oxide Reductase

1
Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5, Canada
2
National Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, Institute of Crop Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 August 2018 / Revised: 24 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agriculture for Climate Change Adaptation)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1607 KB, uploaded 27 September 2018]   |  

Abstract

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Although it comprises only 0.03% of total GHGs produced, N2O makes a marked contribution to global warming. Much of the N2O in the atmosphere issues from incomplete bacterial denitrification processes acting on high levels of nitrogen (N) in the soil due to fertilizer usage. Using less fertilizer is the obvious solution for denitrification mitigation, but there is a significant drawback (especially where not enough N is available for the crop via N deposition, irrigation water, mineral soil N, or mineralization of organic matter): some crops require high-N fertilizer to produce the yields necessary to help feed the world’s increasing population. Alternatives for denitrification have considerable caveats. The long-standing promise of genetic modification for N fixation may be expanded now to enhance dissimilatory denitrification via genetic engineering. Biotechnology may solve what is thought to be a pivotal environmental challenge of the 21st century, reducing GHGs. Current approaches towards N2O mitigation are examined here, revealing an innovative solution for producing staple crops that can ‘crack’ N2O. The transfer of the bacterial nitrous oxide reductase gene (nosZ) into plants may herald the development of plants that express the nitrous oxide reductase enzyme (N2OR). This tactic would parallel the precedents of using the molecular toolkit innately offered by the soil microflora to reduce the environmental footprint of agriculture. View Full-Text
Keywords: radiative warming; atmospheric phytoremediation; N2O; nitrous oxide reductase; N2OR; nosZ; fertilizer; crop breeding; transgenic; GHG radiative warming; atmospheric phytoremediation; N2O; nitrous oxide reductase; N2OR; nosZ; fertilizer; crop breeding; transgenic; GHG
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Demone, J.J.; Wan, S.; Nourimand, M.; Hansen, A.E.; Shu, Q.-Y.; Altosaar, I. New Breeding Techniques for Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation: Plants May Express Nitrous Oxide Reductase. Climate 2018, 6, 80.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Climate EISSN 2225-1154 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top