Next Article in Journal
Cloning and Expression of a Perilla frutescens Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Catalyzing the Hydroxylation of Phenylpropenes
Next Article in Special Issue
Ascorbic Acid Induces the Increase of Secondary Metabolites, Antioxidant Activity, Growth, and Productivity of the Common Bean under Water Stress Conditions
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Mechanoperception in Plant Cell Wall Integrity Maintenance
Previous Article in Special Issue
Triacontanol Promotes the Fruit Development and Retards Fruit Senescence in Strawberry: A Transcriptome Analysis
Article

Optimizing N Fertilization to Improve Yield, Technological and Nutritional Quality of Tomato Grown in High Fertility Soil Conditions

by 1,2, 3 and 3,*
1
Department of Life Science, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Amendola, n. 2, 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy
2
CRPA Centro Ricerche Produzioni Animali, viale Timavo 43/2, 42121 Reggio Emilia, Italy
3
CREA Research Centre for Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Via Cavalleggeri, 25, 84098 Pontecagnano Faiano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(5), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050575
Received: 11 April 2020 / Revised: 26 April 2020 / Accepted: 26 April 2020 / Published: 1 May 2020
Processing tomato is the second most important worldwide cash crop, generally produced in high-input systems. However, fruit yield and quality are affected by agronomic management, particularly nitrogen (N) fertilization, whose application to indeterminate growth genotypes for canning has yet to be investigated in depth. Hence, the objective of this work was to assess the effects of different N rates (0, 50, 125, 200, 275, and 350 kg ha−1) on fruit yield and quality characteristics of processing tomato ‘San Marzano’ landrace. The results of our study showed that 125 and 200 kg of N ha−1 are the most appropriate rates in soil with high fertility, ensuring the highest values of marketable yield and brix yield. However, plants fertilized with 125 kg of N ha−1 attained higher values of N efficiency and fruit K and P concentrations than plants fertilized with 200 kg of N ha−1. Our results suggest that overdoses of N supplies negatively affected fruit yield and quality of San Marzano landrace grown in high soil fertility conditions, also reducing the agricultural sustainability. Hence, specific agronomic protocol and extension services are required to optimally manage tomato crop systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: Solanum lycopersicum L.; sustainability; harvest index; N-efficiency; Brix; nitrate; mineral composition Solanum lycopersicum L.; sustainability; harvest index; N-efficiency; Brix; nitrate; mineral composition
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ronga, D.; Pentangelo, A.; Parisi, M. Optimizing N Fertilization to Improve Yield, Technological and Nutritional Quality of Tomato Grown in High Fertility Soil Conditions. Plants 2020, 9, 575. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050575

AMA Style

Ronga D, Pentangelo A, Parisi M. Optimizing N Fertilization to Improve Yield, Technological and Nutritional Quality of Tomato Grown in High Fertility Soil Conditions. Plants. 2020; 9(5):575. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050575

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ronga, Domenico, Alfonso Pentangelo, and Mario Parisi. 2020. "Optimizing N Fertilization to Improve Yield, Technological and Nutritional Quality of Tomato Grown in High Fertility Soil Conditions" Plants 9, no. 5: 575. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050575

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop