Next Article in Journal
The Treasure Vault Can be Opened: Large-Scale Genome Skimming Works Well Using Herbarium and Silica Gel Dried Material
Next Article in Special Issue
Effects of Drought and Salinity on Two Commercial Varieties of Lavandula angustifolia Mill
Previous Article in Journal
Silicon and Plant–Animal Interactions: Towards an Evolutionary Framework
Open AccessArticle

Exogenous Ascorbic Acid Induced Chilling Tolerance in Tomato Plants Through Modulating Metabolism, Osmolytes, Antioxidants, and Transcriptional Regulation of Catalase and Heat Shock Proteins

1
Botany Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522, Egypt
2
Biology Department, Aliumum University College, Umm Al-Qura University, Mecca 21955, Saudi Arabia
3
Business Administration Department, Community college, King Khalid University, Guraiger, Abha 62529, Saudi Arabia
4
Faculty of Agriculture, Tanta University, Tanta 31512, Egypt
5
EPCRS Excellence Center, Plant Pathology and Biotechnology Laboratory, Agricultural Botany Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafr El-Sheikh 33516, Egypt
6
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Damanhour University, Damanhour 22511, AlBeheira, Egypt
7
Botany Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31512, Egypt
8
Department of Botany and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Moharram baik 21515, Alexandria, Egypt
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(4), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040431
Received: 9 March 2020 / Revised: 20 March 2020 / Accepted: 22 March 2020 / Published: 1 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Crop and Medical Plants)
Chilling, a sort of cold stress, is a typical abiotic ecological stress that impacts the development as well as the growth of crops. The present study was carried to investigate the role of ascorbic acid root priming in enhancing tolerance of tomato seedlings against acute chilling stress. The treatments included untreated control, ascorbic acid-treated plants (AsA; 0.5 mM), acute chilling-stressed plants (4 °C), and chilling stressed seedlings treated by ascorbic acid. Exposure to acute chilling stress reduced growth in terms of length, fresh and dry biomass, pigment synthesis, and photosynthesis. AsA was effective in mitigating the injurious effects of chilling stress to significant levels when supplied at 0.5 mM concentrations. AsA priming reduced the chilling mediated oxidative damage by lowering the electrolyte leakage, lipid peroxidation, and hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, up regulating the activity of enzymatic components of the antioxidant system. Further, 0.5 mM AsA proved beneficial in enhancing ions uptake in normal and chilling stressed seedlings. At the gene expression level, AsA significantly lowered the expression level of CAT and heat shock protein genes. Therefore, we theorize that the implementation of exogenous AsA treatment reduced the negative effects of severe chilling stress on tomato. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ascorbic Acid; chilling; tomato; gene expression; catalase; Heat Shock Proteins Ascorbic Acid; chilling; tomato; gene expression; catalase; Heat Shock Proteins
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Elkelish, A.; Qari, S.H.; Mazrou, Y.S.A.; Abdelaal, K.A.A.; Hafez, Y.M.; Abu-Elsaoud, A.M.; Batiha, G. .-S.; El-Esawi, M.A.; El Nahhas, N. Exogenous Ascorbic Acid Induced Chilling Tolerance in Tomato Plants Through Modulating Metabolism, Osmolytes, Antioxidants, and Transcriptional Regulation of Catalase and Heat Shock Proteins. Plants 2020, 9, 431.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop