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Breeding Buckwheat for Increased Levels of Rutin, Quercetin and Other Bioactive Compounds with Potential Antiviral Effects

1
Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
2
Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
3
Nutrition Institute, Tržaška 40, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(12), 1638; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9121638
Received: 9 October 2020 / Revised: 20 November 2020 / Accepted: 23 November 2020 / Published: 24 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breeding Buckwheat for Nutritional Quality)
Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) and Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn.) are sources of many bioactive compounds, such as rutin, quercetin, emodin, fagopyrin and other (poly)phenolics. In damaged or milled grain under wet conditions, most of the rutin in common and Tartary buckwheat is degraded to quercetin by rutin-degrading enzymes (e.g., rutinosidase). From Tartary buckwheat varieties with low rutinosidase activity it is possible to prepare foods with high levels of rutin, with the preserved initial levels in the grain. The quercetin from rutin degradation in Tartary buckwheat grain is responsible in part for inhibition of α-glucosidase in the intestine, which helps to maintain normal glucose levels in the blood. Rutin and emodin have the potential for antiviral effects. Grain embryos are rich in rutin, so breeding buckwheat with the aim of producing larger embryos may be a promising strategy to increase the levels of rutin in common and Tartary buckwheat grain, and hence to improve its nutritional value. View Full-Text
Keywords: breeding; buckwheat; flavonoids; rutin; quercetin; emodin; fagopyrin; antiviral activity breeding; buckwheat; flavonoids; rutin; quercetin; emodin; fagopyrin; antiviral activity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Luthar, Z.; Germ, M.; Likar, M.; Golob, A.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Pongrac, P.; Kušar, A.; Pravst, I.; Kreft, I. Breeding Buckwheat for Increased Levels of Rutin, Quercetin and Other Bioactive Compounds with Potential Antiviral Effects. Plants 2020, 9, 1638. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9121638

AMA Style

Luthar Z, Germ M, Likar M, Golob A, Vogel-Mikuš K, Pongrac P, Kušar A, Pravst I, Kreft I. Breeding Buckwheat for Increased Levels of Rutin, Quercetin and Other Bioactive Compounds with Potential Antiviral Effects. Plants. 2020; 9(12):1638. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9121638

Chicago/Turabian Style

Luthar, Zlata; Germ, Mateja; Likar, Matevž; Golob, Aleksandra; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Pongrac, Paula; Kušar, Anita; Pravst, Igor; Kreft, Ivan. 2020. "Breeding Buckwheat for Increased Levels of Rutin, Quercetin and Other Bioactive Compounds with Potential Antiviral Effects" Plants 9, no. 12: 1638. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9121638

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