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Open AccessArticle

Growth and Nutritional Responses of Bean and Soybean Genotypes to Elevated CO2 in a Controlled Environment

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CBQF—Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina—Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Rua Diogo Botelho 1327, 4169-005 Porto, Portugal
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CIIMAR – Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Avenida General Norton de Matos, 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal
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ICBAS, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas de Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(11), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8110465
Received: 6 August 2019 / Revised: 10 October 2019 / Accepted: 22 October 2019 / Published: 30 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adapting Crops to Climate Change)
In the current situation of a constant increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration, there is a potential risk of decreased nutritional value and food crop quality. Therefore, selecting strong-responsive varieties to elevated CO2 (eCO2) conditions in terms of yield and nutritional quality is an important decision for improving crop productivity under future CO2 conditions. Using bean and soybean varieties of contrasting responses to eCO2 and different origins, we assessed the effects of eCO2 (800 ppm) in a controlled environment on the yield performance and the concentration of protein, fat, and mineral elements in seeds. The range of seed yield responses to eCO2 was −11.0 to 32.7% (average change of 5%) in beans and −23.8 to 39.6% (average change of 7.1%) in soybeans. There was a significant correlation between seed yield enhancement and aboveground biomass, seed number, and pod number per plant. At maturity, eCO2 increased seed protein concentration in beans, while it did not affect soybean. Lipid concentration was not affected by eCO2 in either legume species. Compared with ambient CO2 (aCO2), the concentrations of manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), and potassium (K) decreased significantly, magnesium (Mg) increased, while zinc (Zn), phosphorus (P), and calcium (Ca) were not changed under eCO2 in bean seeds. However, in soybean, Mn and K concentrations decreased significantly, Ca increased, and Zn, Fe, P, and Mg concentrations were not significantly affected by eCO2 conditions. Our results suggest that intraspecific variation in seed yield improvement and reduced sensitivity to mineral losses might be suitable parameters for breeders to begin selecting lines that maximize yield and nutrition under eCO2. View Full-Text
Keywords: bean; elevated CO2; controlled environment; mineral concentrations; seed yield; soybean bean; elevated CO2; controlled environment; mineral concentrations; seed yield; soybean
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MDPI and ACS Style

Soares, J.; Deuchande, T.; Valente, L.M.P.; Pintado, M.; Vasconcelos, M.W. Growth and Nutritional Responses of Bean and Soybean Genotypes to Elevated CO2 in a Controlled Environment. Plants 2019, 8, 465. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8110465

AMA Style

Soares J, Deuchande T, Valente LMP, Pintado M, Vasconcelos MW. Growth and Nutritional Responses of Bean and Soybean Genotypes to Elevated CO2 in a Controlled Environment. Plants. 2019; 8(11):465. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8110465

Chicago/Turabian Style

Soares, José; Deuchande, Teresa; Valente, Luísa M.P.; Pintado, Manuela; Vasconcelos, Marta W. 2019. "Growth and Nutritional Responses of Bean and Soybean Genotypes to Elevated CO2 in a Controlled Environment" Plants 8, no. 11: 465. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8110465

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