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Plants 2018, 7(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants7040089

Hitting the Wall—Sensing and Signaling Pathways Involved in Plant Cell Wall Remodeling in Response to Abiotic Stress

1
School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
2
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
3
La Trobe Institute for Agriculture and Food, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 September 2018 / Revised: 16 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Cell Wall Dynamics in Plant Growth and Stress Response)
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Abstract

Plant cells are surrounded by highly dynamic cell walls that play important roles regulating aspects of plant development. Recent advances in visualization and measurement of cell wall properties have enabled accumulation of new data about wall architecture and biomechanics. This has resulted in greater understanding of the dynamics of cell wall deposition and remodeling. The cell wall is the first line of defense against different adverse abiotic and biotic environmental influences. Different abiotic stress conditions such as salinity, drought, and frost trigger production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) which act as important signaling molecules in stress activated cellular responses. Detection of ROS by still-elusive receptors triggers numerous signaling events that result in production of different protective compounds or even cell death, but most notably in stress-induced cell wall remodeling. This is mediated by different plant hormones, of which the most studied are jasmonic acid and brassinosteroids. In this review we highlight key factors involved in sensing, signal transduction, and response(s) to abiotic stress and how these mechanisms are related to cell wall-associated stress acclimatization. ROS, plant hormones, cell wall remodeling enzymes and different wall mechanosensors act coordinately during abiotic stress, resulting in abiotic stress wall acclimatization, enabling plants to survive adverse environmental conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: cell wall; abiotic stress; signal transduction; reactive oxygen species; hormones; remodeling cell wall; abiotic stress; signal transduction; reactive oxygen species; hormones; remodeling
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Novaković, L.; Guo, T.; Bacic, A.; Sampathkumar, A.; Johnson, K.L. Hitting the Wall—Sensing and Signaling Pathways Involved in Plant Cell Wall Remodeling in Response to Abiotic Stress. Plants 2018, 7, 89.

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