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Article

Nutrient Status of Cucumber Plants Affects Powdery Mildew (Podosphaera xanthii)

1
Department Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, 68 Hamakabim Rd, Rishon LeZion 7534509, Israel
2
The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
3
Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, D.N. Negev 2, Bet Dagan 85280, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Giovanna Visioli, Agnieszka Jamiołkowska, Izabela Kot and Francesca Degola
Plants 2021, 10(10), 2216; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102216
Received: 22 September 2021 / Revised: 12 October 2021 / Accepted: 15 October 2021 / Published: 19 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Weaponizing Plants: Biocontrol and Biosecurity in Plant Protection)
We examined the effects of applications of N, P, K, Mg, and Ca through an irrigation solution and spraying K, Ca, and Mg salts on cucumber powdery mildew (CPM, Podosphaera xanthii) in potted plants and under commercial-like conditions. Spraying CaCl2 and MgCl2, or KCl and K2SO4, decreased CPM. There were significant negative correlations between the anion-related molar concentrations of the salts and disease severity. Among the sprayed treatments, NaCl provided significantly less CPM control when applied at a low (0.05 M) concentration, as compared with CaCl2 and MgCl2. When sprayed applications of Mg and K salts were analyzed separately from the untreated control, the Cl salts were found to be more effective than the SO4−2 salts. High N and Mg concentrations in the irrigation water delivered to young, fruit-less cucumber plants reduced CPM, whereas more CPM was observed when the irrigation solution contained a medium amount of P and a high amount of K. In contrast, mature, fruit-bearing plants had less severe CPM at higher N, lower P, and higher K levels. Spraying mature plants with monopotassium phosphate, polyhalite (K2Ca2Mg(SO4)4·2H2O), and the salts mentioned above over an entire growing season suppressed CPM. CPM severity was also reduced by spray applications of Ca, Mg, and KSO4−2 and Cl salts. Spray applications provided better CPM control than fertigation treatments. Induced resistance is probably involved in the effects of nutrients on CPM. View Full-Text
Keywords: agrotechnical control; calcium; Cucumis sativus; cultural control; integrated management; powdery mildew; magnesium; plant disease; potassium agrotechnical control; calcium; Cucumis sativus; cultural control; integrated management; powdery mildew; magnesium; plant disease; potassium
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MDPI and ACS Style

Elad, Y.; Barnea, D.; Rav-David, D.; Yermiyahu, U. Nutrient Status of Cucumber Plants Affects Powdery Mildew (Podosphaera xanthii). Plants 2021, 10, 2216. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102216

AMA Style

Elad Y, Barnea D, Rav-David D, Yermiyahu U. Nutrient Status of Cucumber Plants Affects Powdery Mildew (Podosphaera xanthii). Plants. 2021; 10(10):2216. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102216

Chicago/Turabian Style

Elad, Yigal, Dor Barnea, Dalia Rav-David, and Uri Yermiyahu. 2021. "Nutrient Status of Cucumber Plants Affects Powdery Mildew (Podosphaera xanthii)" Plants 10, no. 10: 2216. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102216

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