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Article

The Effect of a Host on the Primary Metabolic Profiling of Cuscuta Campestris’ Main Organs, Haustoria, Stem and Flower

by 1 and 1,2,*
1
Migal—Galilee Technology Center, P.O. Box 831, Kiryat Shmona 1101600, Israel
2
Tel-Hai College, Kfar Giladi 1220800, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Yaakov Goldwasser, Evgenia Dor and Pablo Castillo
Plants 2021, 10(10), 2098; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102098
Received: 14 August 2021 / Revised: 26 September 2021 / Accepted: 28 September 2021 / Published: 3 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parasitic Weeds: Biology and Control)
Cuscuta campestris (dodder) is a stem holoparasitic plant without leaves or roots that parasitizes various types of host plants and causes damage to certain crops worldwide. This study aimed at gaining more knowledge about the effect of the hosts on the parasite’s levels of primary metabolites. To this end, metabolic profiling analyses were performed on the parasite’s three main organs, haustoria, stem and flowers, which developed on three hosts, Heliotropium hirsutissimum, Polygonum equisetiforme and Amaranthus viridis. The results showed significant differences in the metabolic profiles of C. campestris that developed on the different hosts, suggesting that the parasites rely highly on the host’s metabolites. However, changes in the metabolites’ contents between the organs that developed on the same host suggest that the parasite can also self-regulate its metabolites. Flowers, for example, have significantly higher levels of most of the amino acids and sugar acids, while haustoria and stem have higher levels of several sugars and polyols. Determination of total soluble proteins and phenolic compounds showed that the same pattern is detected in the organs unrelated to the hosts. This study contributes to our knowledge about the metabolic behavior of this parasite. View Full-Text
Keywords: GC-MS analysis; holoparasitic plant; metabolic changes; parasitic organs GC-MS analysis; holoparasitic plant; metabolic changes; parasitic organs
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kumar, K.; Amir, R. The Effect of a Host on the Primary Metabolic Profiling of Cuscuta Campestris’ Main Organs, Haustoria, Stem and Flower. Plants 2021, 10, 2098. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102098

AMA Style

Kumar K, Amir R. The Effect of a Host on the Primary Metabolic Profiling of Cuscuta Campestris’ Main Organs, Haustoria, Stem and Flower. Plants. 2021; 10(10):2098. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102098

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kumar, Krishna, and Rachel Amir. 2021. "The Effect of a Host on the Primary Metabolic Profiling of Cuscuta Campestris’ Main Organs, Haustoria, Stem and Flower" Plants 10, no. 10: 2098. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102098

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