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Muscular Atrophy and Sarcopenia in the Elderly: Is There a Role for Creatine Supplementation?

1
Applied Physiology & Nutrition Research Group, School of Physical Education and Sport, Rheumatology Division, Faculdade de Medicina FMUSP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 01246-000 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
2
Bone Metabolism Laboratory, Disciplina de Reumatologia, Hospital das Clínicas HCFMUSP, Faculdade de Medicina FMUSP, Universidade de São Paulo, 01246-903 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Biomolecules 2019, 9(11), 642; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9110642
Received: 18 September 2019 / Revised: 17 October 2019 / Accepted: 18 October 2019 / Published: 23 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Creatine as a Therapeutic Strategy)
Sarcopenia is characterized by a loss of muscle mass, quality, and function, and negatively impacts health, functionality, and quality of life for numerous populations, particularly older adults. Creatine is an endogenously produced metabolite, which has the theoretical potential to counteract many of the morphological and metabolic parameters underpinning sarcopenia. This can occur through a range of direct and indirect mechanisms, including temporal and spatial functions that accelerate ATP regeneration during times of high energy demand, direct anabolic and anti-catabolic functions, and enhanced muscle regenerating capacity through positively impacting muscle stem cell availability. Studies conducted in older adults show little benefit of creatine supplementation alone on muscle function or mass. In contrast, creatine supplementation as an adjunct to exercise training seems to augment the muscle adaptive response to the training stimulus, potentially through increasing capacity for higher intensity exercise, and/or by enhancing post-exercise recovery and adaptation. As such, creatine may be an effective dietary strategy to combat age-related muscle atrophy and sarcopenia when used to complement the benefits of exercise training. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary supplements; ergogenic aids; healthy ageing; muscle; metabolism; bioenergetics; older adults; sarcopenia dietary supplements; ergogenic aids; healthy ageing; muscle; metabolism; bioenergetics; older adults; sarcopenia
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Dolan, E.; Artioli, G.G.; Pereira, R.M.R.; Gualano, B. Muscular Atrophy and Sarcopenia in the Elderly: Is There a Role for Creatine Supplementation? Biomolecules 2019, 9, 642.

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