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Open AccessArticle

Highly Sensitive and Rapid Characterization of the Development of Synchronized Blood Stage Malaria Parasites Via Magneto-Optical Hemozoin Quantification

1
Department of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics and MTA-BME Lendület Magneto-optical Spectroscopy Research Group, 1111 Budapest, Hungary
2
Institute of Enzymology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1117 Budapest, Hungary
3
Department of Applied Biotechnology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1111 Budapest, Hungary
4
Beykoz Institute of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul 34093, Turkey
5
Department of Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to the present work.
Biomolecules 2019, 9(10), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9100579
Received: 28 June 2019 / Revised: 23 August 2019 / Accepted: 2 September 2019 / Published: 7 October 2019
The rotating-crystal magneto-optical diagnostic (RMOD) technique was developed as a sensitive and rapid platform for malaria diagnosis. Herein, we report a detailed in vivo assessment of the synchronized Plasmodium vinckei lentum strain blood-stage infections by the RMOD method and comparing the results to the unsynchronized Plasmodium yoelii 17X-NL (non-lethal) infections. Furthermore, we assess the hemozoin production and clearance dynamics in chloroquine-treated compared to untreated self-resolving infections by RMOD. The findings of the study suggest that the RMOD signal is directly proportional to the hemozoin content and closely follows the actual parasitemia level. The lack of long-term accumulation of hemozoin in peripheral blood implies a dynamic equilibrium between the hemozoin production rate of the parasites and the immune system’s clearing mechanism. Using parasites with synchronous blood stage cycle, which resemble human malaria parasite infections with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, we are demonstrating that the RMOD detects both hemozoin production and clearance rates with high sensitivity and temporal resolution. Thus, RMOD technique offers a quantitative tool to follow the maturation of the malaria parasites even on sub-cycle timescales. View Full-Text
Keywords: malaria; Plasmodium vinckei; Plasmodium yoelii; rotating-crystal magneto-optical diagnostic; hemozoin; synchronous blood stage malaria; Plasmodium vinckei; Plasmodium yoelii; rotating-crystal magneto-optical diagnostic; hemozoin; synchronous blood stage
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pukáncsik, M.; Molnár, P.; Orbán, Á.; Butykai, Á.; Marton, L.; Kézsmárki, I.; Vértessy, B.G.; Kamil, M.; Abraham, A.; Aly, A.S.I. Highly Sensitive and Rapid Characterization of the Development of Synchronized Blood Stage Malaria Parasites Via Magneto-Optical Hemozoin Quantification. Biomolecules 2019, 9, 579. https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9100579

AMA Style

Pukáncsik M, Molnár P, Orbán Á, Butykai Á, Marton L, Kézsmárki I, Vértessy BG, Kamil M, Abraham A, Aly ASI. Highly Sensitive and Rapid Characterization of the Development of Synchronized Blood Stage Malaria Parasites Via Magneto-Optical Hemozoin Quantification. Biomolecules. 2019; 9(10):579. https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9100579

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pukáncsik, Mária; Molnár, Petra; Orbán, Ágnes; Butykai, Ádám; Marton, Lívia; Kézsmárki, István; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Kamil, Mohd; Abraham, Amanah; Aly, Ahmed S.I. 2019. "Highly Sensitive and Rapid Characterization of the Development of Synchronized Blood Stage Malaria Parasites Via Magneto-Optical Hemozoin Quantification" Biomolecules 9, no. 10: 579. https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9100579

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