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Article

Characterization of Bulk Phosphatidylcholine Compositions in Human Plasma Using Side-Chain Resolving Lipidomics

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Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München—German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
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Experimental Bioinformatics, TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan, Technical University of Munich, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
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Research Unit Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism, Helmholtz Zentrum München—German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
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Institute for Computational Biomedicine, Englander Institute for Precision Medicine, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York City, NY 10021, USA
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Institute of Computational Bioinformatics, Helmholtz Zentrum München—German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
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ZIEL Institute for Food and Health, Core Facility Human Studies Technical University of Munich, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
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Else Kroener-Frensenius-Center of Nutritional Medicine, Technical University of Munich, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
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Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medicine—Qatar, Education City, P.O. Box 24144, Doha, Qatar
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Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117596, Singapore
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Institute for Nutritional Medicine, University Hospital Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, 80992 Munich, Germany
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Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 Leiden, The Netherlands
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Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 Leiden, The Netherlands
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Metabolon, Inc., Morrisville, NC 27560, USA
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Chair of Nutrition Physiology, TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan, Technical University of Munich, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
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German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metabolites 2019, 9(6), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9060109
Received: 1 May 2019 / Revised: 4 June 2019 / Accepted: 5 June 2019 / Published: 8 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics in Epidemiological Studies)
Kit-based assays, such as AbsoluteIDQTM p150, are widely used in large cohort studies and provide a standardized method to quantify blood concentrations of phosphatidylcholines (PCs). Many disease-relevant associations of PCs were reported using this method. However, their interpretation is hampered by lack of functionally-relevant information on the detailed fatty acid side-chain compositions as only the total number of carbon atoms and double bonds is identified by the kit. To enable more substantiated interpretations, we characterized these PC sums using the side-chain resolving LipidyzerTM platform, analyzing 223 samples in parallel to the AbsoluteIDQTM. Combining these datasets, we estimated the quantitative composition of PC sums and subsequently tested their replication in an independent cohort. We identified major constituents of 28 PC sums, revealing also various unexpected compositions. As an example, PC 16:0_22:5 accounted for more than 50% of the PC sum with in total 38 carbon atoms and 5 double bonds (PC aa 38:5). For 13 PC sums, we found relatively high abundances of odd-chain fatty acids. In conclusion, our study provides insights in PC compositions in human plasma, facilitating interpretation of existing epidemiological data sets and potentially enabling imputation of PC compositions for future meta-analyses of lipidomics data. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolomics; lipidomics; phospholipids; isobaric phosphatidylcholines; lipid species; fatty acid composition; platform comparison; harmonization; imputation metabolomics; lipidomics; phospholipids; isobaric phosphatidylcholines; lipid species; fatty acid composition; platform comparison; harmonization; imputation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Quell, J.D.; Römisch-Margl, W.; Haid, M.; Krumsiek, J.; Skurk, T.; Halama, A.; Stephan, N.; Adamski, J.; Hauner, H.; Mook-Kanamori, D.; Mohney, R.P.; Daniel, H.; Suhre, K.; Kastenmüller, G. Characterization of Bulk Phosphatidylcholine Compositions in Human Plasma Using Side-Chain Resolving Lipidomics. Metabolites 2019, 9, 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9060109

AMA Style

Quell JD, Römisch-Margl W, Haid M, Krumsiek J, Skurk T, Halama A, Stephan N, Adamski J, Hauner H, Mook-Kanamori D, Mohney RP, Daniel H, Suhre K, Kastenmüller G. Characterization of Bulk Phosphatidylcholine Compositions in Human Plasma Using Side-Chain Resolving Lipidomics. Metabolites. 2019; 9(6):109. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9060109

Chicago/Turabian Style

Quell, Jan D., Werner Römisch-Margl, Mark Haid, Jan Krumsiek, Thomas Skurk, Anna Halama, Nisha Stephan, Jerzy Adamski, Hans Hauner, Dennis Mook-Kanamori, Robert P. Mohney, Hannelore Daniel, Karsten Suhre, and Gabi Kastenmüller. 2019. "Characterization of Bulk Phosphatidylcholine Compositions in Human Plasma Using Side-Chain Resolving Lipidomics" Metabolites 9, no. 6: 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9060109

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