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Open AccessArticle

Urate and Nonanoate Mark the Relationship between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and Blood Pressure in Adolescent Girls: A Metabolomics Analysis in the ELEMENT Cohort

1
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
2
Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes Center, Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
3
Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
4
Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA
5
Program for Diabetes and Obesity, The Saban Research Institute, Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA
6
Center for Research on Nutrition and Health, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca 62100, México
7
CONACYT, National Institute of Public Health, Center for Research on Nutrition and Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62100, Mexico
8
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metabolites 2019, 9(5), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9050100
Received: 5 March 2019 / Revised: 14 May 2019 / Accepted: 15 May 2019 / Published: 17 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics in Epidemiological Studies)
We sought to identify metabolites that mark the relationship of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake with adiposity and metabolic risk among boys (n = 114) and girls (n = 128) aged 8–14 years. We conducted the analysis in three steps: (1) linear regression to examine associations of SSB intake (quartiles) with adiposity, glycemia, lipids, and blood pressure (BP); (2) least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression to identify SSB-associated metabolites from an untargeted dataset of 938 metabolites; and (3) linear regression to determine whether SSB-related metabolites are also associated with adiposity and metabolic risk. In girls, SSB intake was associated with marginally higher BP (Q2 vs, Q1: 1.11 [−3.90, 6.13], Q3 vs. Q1: 1.16 [−3.81, 6.13], Q4 vs. Q1: 4.65 [−0.22, 9.53] mmHg systolic blood pressure (SBP); P-trend = 0.07). In boys, SSB intake corresponded with higher C-peptide insulin resistance (Q2 vs. Q1: 0.06 [−0.06, 0.19], Q3 vs. Q1: 0.01 [−0.12, 0.14], Q4 vs. Q1: 0.17 [0.04, 0.30] ng/mL; P-trend = 0.03) and leptin (P-trend = 0.02). LASSO identified 6 annotated metabolites in girls (5-methyl-tetrohydrofolate, phenylephrine, urate, nonanoate, deoxyuridine, sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and 3 annotated metabolites in boys (2-piperidinone, octanoylcarnitine, catechol) associated with SSB intake. Among girls, urate and nonanoate marked the relationship of SSB intake with BP. None of the SSB-associated metabolites were related to health outcomes in boys. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar-sweetened beverages; adolescents; metabolomics; LASSO; metabolic risk; blood pressure; uric acid; urate; nonanoate sugar-sweetened beverages; adolescents; metabolomics; LASSO; metabolic risk; blood pressure; uric acid; urate; nonanoate
MDPI and ACS Style

Perng, W.; Tang, L.; Song, P.X.K.; Goran, M.; Tellez Rojo, M.M.; Cantoral, A.; Peterson, K.E. Urate and Nonanoate Mark the Relationship between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and Blood Pressure in Adolescent Girls: A Metabolomics Analysis in the ELEMENT Cohort. Metabolites 2019, 9, 100. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9050100

AMA Style

Perng W, Tang L, Song PXK, Goran M, Tellez Rojo MM, Cantoral A, Peterson KE. Urate and Nonanoate Mark the Relationship between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and Blood Pressure in Adolescent Girls: A Metabolomics Analysis in the ELEMENT Cohort. Metabolites. 2019; 9(5):100. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9050100

Chicago/Turabian Style

Perng, Wei; Tang, Lu; Song, Peter X.K.; Goran, Michael; Tellez Rojo, Martha M.; Cantoral, Alejandra; Peterson, Karen E. 2019. "Urate and Nonanoate Mark the Relationship between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and Blood Pressure in Adolescent Girls: A Metabolomics Analysis in the ELEMENT Cohort" Metabolites 9, no. 5: 100. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9050100

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