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Review

Postharvest Water Loss of Wine Grape: When, What and Why

1
Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, via del Borghetto 80, 56124 Pisa, Italy
2
Interdepartmental Research Center, Nutraceuticals and Food for Health, University of Pisa, Via del Borghetto 80, 56124 Pisa, Italy
3
Institute of Life Sciences, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Piazza Martiri della Libertà 33, 56127 Pisa, Italy
4
Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems, University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo de Lellis, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jose M. Lorenzo
Metabolites 2021, 11(5), 318; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11050318
Received: 30 March 2021 / Revised: 4 May 2021 / Accepted: 7 May 2021 / Published: 14 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomic Analysis in Food Science)
In postharvest science, water loss is always considered a negative factor threatening fruit and vegetable quality, but in the wine field, this physical process is employed to provide high-quality wine, such as Amarone and Passito wines. The main reason for this is the significant metabolic changes occurring during wine grape water loss, changes that are highly dependent on the specific water loss rate and level, as well as the ambient conditions under which grapes are kept to achieve dehydration. In this review, hints on the main techniques used to induce postharvest wine grape water loss and information on the most important metabolic changes occurring in grape berries during water loss are reported. The quality of wines produced from dried/dehydrated/withered grapes is also discussed, together with an update on the application of innovative non-destructive techniques in the wine sector. A wide survey of the scientific papers published all over the world on the topic has been carried out. View Full-Text
Keywords: dehydration; withering; wine grape; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); polyphenols; anthocyanins; sensory profile; non-destructive monitoring dehydration; withering; wine grape; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); polyphenols; anthocyanins; sensory profile; non-destructive monitoring
MDPI and ACS Style

Sanmartin, C.; Modesti, M.; Venturi, F.; Brizzolara, S.; Mencarelli, F.; Bellincontro, A. Postharvest Water Loss of Wine Grape: When, What and Why. Metabolites 2021, 11, 318. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11050318

AMA Style

Sanmartin C, Modesti M, Venturi F, Brizzolara S, Mencarelli F, Bellincontro A. Postharvest Water Loss of Wine Grape: When, What and Why. Metabolites. 2021; 11(5):318. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11050318

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sanmartin, Chiara, Margherita Modesti, Francesca Venturi, Stefano Brizzolara, Fabio Mencarelli, and Andrea Bellincontro. 2021. "Postharvest Water Loss of Wine Grape: When, What and Why" Metabolites 11, no. 5: 318. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11050318

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