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Impact of Gut Dysbiosis on Neurohormonal Pathways in Chronic Kidney Disease

1
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Riverside Community Hospital, University of California-Riverside School of Medicine, Riverside, CA 92501, USA
3
Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diseases 2019, 7(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases7010021
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 29 January 2019 / Accepted: 8 February 2019 / Published: 13 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiome and Human Diseases)
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide major health problem. Traditional risk factors for CKD are hypertension, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. Recent studies have identified gut dysbiosis as a novel risk factor for the progression CKD and its complications. Dysbiosis can worsen systemic inflammation, which plays an important role in the progression of CKD and its complications such as cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we discuss the beneficial effects of the normal gut microbiota, and then elaborate on how alterations in the biochemical environment of the gastrointestinal tract in CKD can affect gut microbiota. External factors such as dietary restrictions, medications, and dialysis further promote dysbiosis. We discuss the impact of an altered gut microbiota on neuroendocrine pathways such as the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis, the production of neurotransmitters and neuroactive compounds, tryptophan metabolism, and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Finally, therapeutic strategies including diet modification, intestinal alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics are reviewed. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic kidney disease; dysbiosis; gut microbiota; inflammation oxidative stress; prebiotics; probiotics; synbiotics chronic kidney disease; dysbiosis; gut microbiota; inflammation oxidative stress; prebiotics; probiotics; synbiotics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jazani, N.H.; Savoj, J.; Lustgarten, M.; Lau, W.L.; Vaziri, N.D. Impact of Gut Dysbiosis on Neurohormonal Pathways in Chronic Kidney Disease. Diseases 2019, 7, 21.

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