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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Iceland, an Open-Air Museum for Geoheritage and Earth Science Communication Purposes

1
Department of Human and Innovation Sciences, Insubria University, Via S. Abbondio 12, 22100 Como, Italy
2
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milan Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milan, Italy
3
CRUST-Interuniversity Center for 3D Seismotectonics with Territorial Applications, 66100 Chieti Scalo, Italy
4
Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, Bologna University, Via Zamboni 67, 40126 Bologna, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Resources 2020, 9(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources9020014
Received: 7 December 2019 / Revised: 14 January 2020 / Accepted: 28 January 2020 / Published: 2 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geoheritage and Geotourism Resources)
Iceland is one of the most recognizable and iconic places on Earth, offering an unparalleled chance to admire the most powerful natural phenomena related to the combination of geodynamic, tectonic and magmatic forces, such as active rifting, volcanic eruptions and subvolcanic intrusions. We have identified and selected 25 geosites from the Snæfellsnes Peninsula and the Northern Volcanic Zone, areas where most of the above phenomena can be admired as they unfold before the viewers’ eyes. We have qualitatively assessed the selected volcano–tectonic geosites by applying a set of criteria derived from previous studies and illustrated them through field photographs, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-captured images and 3-D models. Finally, we have discussed and compared the different options and advantages provided by such visualization techniques and proposed a novel, cutting-edge approach to geoheritage promotion and popularization, based on interactive, navigable Virtual Outcrops made available online. View Full-Text
Keywords: Iceland; geosite; faults; fractures; dykes; geoheritage; Earth Science communication Iceland; geosite; faults; fractures; dykes; geoheritage; Earth Science communication
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Pasquaré Mariotto, F.; Bonali, F.L.; Venturini, C. Iceland, an Open-Air Museum for Geoheritage and Earth Science Communication Purposes. Resources 2020, 9, 14.

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