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Benefit Sharing in the Arctic: A Systematic View
Open AccessArticle

Globalizing Extraction and Indigenous Rights in the Russian Arctic: The Enduring Role of the State in Natural Resource Governance

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Faculty of International Relations and Politics, North-West Institute of Management, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, 194044 St. Petersburg, Russia
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National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), Laboratory for Studies in Economic Sociology, 101000 Moscow, Russia
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Environmental Policy Group, Wageningen University, 6700 HB Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Centre for Independent Social Research, Ligovsky 87, 197022 St. Petersburg, Russia
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Government and Legal Studies, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME 04011, USA
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Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 550 N. Park Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA
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School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Resources 2019, 8(4), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8040179
Received: 20 October 2019 / Revised: 21 November 2019 / Accepted: 25 November 2019 / Published: 28 November 2019
The governance of extractive industries has become increasingly globalized. International conventions and multi-stakeholder institutions set out rules and standards on a range of issues, such as environmental protection, human rights, and Indigenous rights. Companies’ compliance with these global rules may minimize risks for investors and shareholders, while offering people at sites of extraction more leverage. Although the Russian state retains a significant stake in the oil and gas industries, Russian oil and gas companies have globalized as well, receiving foreign investment, participating in global supply chains, and signing on to global agreements. We investigate how this global engagement has affected Nenets Indigenous communities in Yamal, an oil- and gas-rich region in the Russian Arctic, by analyzing Indigenous protests and benefit-sharing arrangements. Contrary to expectations, we find that Nenets Indigenous communities have not been empowered by international governance measures, and also struggle to use domestic laws to resolve problems. In Russia, the state continues to play a significant role in determining outcomes for Indigenous communities, in part by working with Indigenous associations that are state allies. We conclude that governance generating networks in the region are under-developed. View Full-Text
Keywords: benefit sharing; oil and gas; resources; governance; Russia; resistance; governance generating networks; paternalism; partnership; corporate social responsibility benefit sharing; oil and gas; resources; governance; Russia; resistance; governance generating networks; paternalism; partnership; corporate social responsibility
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Tulaeva, S.A.; Tysiachniouk, M.S.; Henry, L.A.; Horowitz, L.S. Globalizing Extraction and Indigenous Rights in the Russian Arctic: The Enduring Role of the State in Natural Resource Governance. Resources 2019, 8, 179.

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