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Open AccessArticle

Cold Sprayed Tungsten Armor for Tokamak First Wall

1
Institute of Plasma Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 182 00 Prague, Czech Republic
2
Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Brno University of Technology, 616 69 Brno, Czech Republic
3
Institute of Thermomechanics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 182 00 Prague, Czech Republic
4
Impact Innovations GmbH, 84431 Rattenkirchen, Germany
5
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, 20156 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 836; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120836
Received: 9 September 2019 / Revised: 28 November 2019 / Accepted: 2 December 2019 / Published: 7 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cold Spraying: Recent Trends and Future Views)
Harnessing nuclear fusion is a challenging task, in particular because of the demands put on the used materials. In tokamaks, future energy sources, the inner-most chambers are to be coated with dense coatings of W, or W-Cr-based alloys. So far, the attempts for such coatings formation by other methods failed due to oxidation, high porosity, insufficient adhesion, high specific surface, or even insufficient thickness below 10 μ m. Cold spraying seems a promising technology for the task. In our study, we demonstrate the first successful fabrication of thick pure W coatings. W-Cr and W-Cr-Ti coatings were further prepared without oxidation of the metals. All coatings exhibited high hardness levels, good interface quality with three tested substrates and, importantly, a promising potential for formation of stable Cr 2 WO x phases. View Full-Text
Keywords: cold gas kinetic spray; W-Cr; W alloys; oxidation shield; nuclear fusion; thick coatings; self-passivation; PFC; plasma facing components cold gas kinetic spray; W-Cr; W alloys; oxidation shield; nuclear fusion; thick coatings; self-passivation; PFC; plasma facing components
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cizek, J.; Vilemova, M.; Lukac, F.; Koller, M.; Kondas, J.; Singh, R. Cold Sprayed Tungsten Armor for Tokamak First Wall. Coatings 2019, 9, 836. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120836

AMA Style

Cizek J, Vilemova M, Lukac F, Koller M, Kondas J, Singh R. Cold Sprayed Tungsten Armor for Tokamak First Wall. Coatings. 2019; 9(12):836. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120836

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cizek, Jan; Vilemova, Monika; Lukac, Frantisek; Koller, Martin; Kondas, Jan; Singh, Reeti. 2019. "Cold Sprayed Tungsten Armor for Tokamak First Wall" Coatings 9, no. 12: 836. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120836

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