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Open AccessArticle

Thermal Conductivity Analysis and Lifetime Testing of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

1
Department of Engineering Science, University West, Gustava Melins Gata 2, Trollhattan 461 86, Sweden
2
Progressive Surface, Grand Rapids, MI 49512, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Coatings 2014, 4(3), 630-650; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings4030630
Received: 20 July 2014 / Revised: 7 August 2014 / Accepted: 11 August 2014 / Published: 15 August 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Temperature Coatings)
Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has become an interesting method for the production of thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine components. The development of the SPS process has led to structures with segmented vertical cracks or column-like structures that can imitate strain-tolerant air plasma spraying (APS) or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. Additionally, SPS coatings can have lower thermal conductivity than EB-PVD coatings, while also being easier to produce. The combination of similar or improved properties with a potential for lower production costs makes SPS of great interest to the gas turbine industry. This study compares a number of SPS thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with vertical cracks or column-like structures with the reference of segmented APS coatings. The primary focus has been on lifetime testing of these new coating systems. Samples were tested in thermo-cyclic fatigue at temperatures of 1100 °C for 1 h cycles. Additional testing was performed to assess thermal shock performance and erosion resistance. Thermal conductivity was also assessed for samples in their as-sprayed state, and the microstructures were investigated using SEM. View Full-Text
Keywords: thermal barrier coating; suspension plasma spray; thermal shock; thermo-cyclic fatigue; thermal conductivity thermal barrier coating; suspension plasma spray; thermal shock; thermo-cyclic fatigue; thermal conductivity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Curry, N.; VanEvery, K.; Snyder, T.; Markocsan, N. Thermal Conductivity Analysis and Lifetime Testing of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings. Coatings 2014, 4, 630-650. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings4030630

AMA Style

Curry N, VanEvery K, Snyder T, Markocsan N. Thermal Conductivity Analysis and Lifetime Testing of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings. Coatings. 2014; 4(3):630-650. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings4030630

Chicago/Turabian Style

Curry, Nicholas; VanEvery, Kent; Snyder, Todd; Markocsan, Nicolaie. 2014. "Thermal Conductivity Analysis and Lifetime Testing of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings" Coatings 4, no. 3: 630-650. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings4030630

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