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Open AccessArticle

Antimicrobial Activity of Five Apitoxins from Apis mellifera on Two Common Foodborne Pathogens

1
Laboratorio de Higiene Inspección y Control de Alimentos, Departamento de Química Analítica, Nutrición y Bromatología, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo, Spain
2
Laboratorio de Microbiología, Escuela de Ciencias Agrícolas y Ambientales (ECAA) Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Sede Ibarra, Ibarra 100112, Ecuador
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2020, 9(7), 367; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9070367
Received: 2 June 2020 / Revised: 25 June 2020 / Accepted: 26 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as Antimicrobial Agents, 2nd Volume)
Antimicrobial resistance is one of today’s major public health challenges. Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria have been responsible for an increasing number of deaths in recent decades. These resistant bacteria are also a concern in the food chain, as bacteria can resist common biocides used in the food industry and reach consumers. As a consequence, the search for alternatives to common antimicrobials by the scientific community has intensified. Substances obtained from nature have shown great potential as new sources of antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of five bee venoms, also called apitoxins, against two common foodborne pathogens. A total of 50 strains of the Gram-negative pathogen Salmonella enterica and 8 strains of the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes were tested. The results show that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were highly influenced by the bacterial genus. The MIC values ranged from 256 to 1024 µg/mL in S. enterica and from 16 to 32 µg/mL in L. monocytogenes. The results of this study demonstrate that apitoxin is a potential alternative agent against common foodborne pathogens, and it can be included in the development of new models to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria in the food chain. View Full-Text
Keywords: apitoxin; antimicrobial resistance; natural antimicrobial compounds; foodborne pathogens; Salmonella; Listeria monocytogenes apitoxin; antimicrobial resistance; natural antimicrobial compounds; foodborne pathogens; Salmonella; Listeria monocytogenes
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Lamas, A.; Arteaga, V.; Regal, P.; Vázquez, B.; Miranda, J.M.; Cepeda, A.; Franco, C.M. Antimicrobial Activity of Five Apitoxins from Apis mellifera on Two Common Foodborne Pathogens. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 367.

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