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The Roles of Microbial Cell-Cell Chemical Communication Systems in the Modulation of Antimicrobial Resistance

by 1,2,†, 1,2,† and 1,2,*
1
Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou 510642, China
2
Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Microbial Signals and Disease Control, Integrative Microbiology Research Center, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contribute equally to this manuscript.
Antibiotics 2020, 9(11), 779; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9110779
Received: 23 September 2020 / Revised: 2 November 2020 / Accepted: 4 November 2020 / Published: 6 November 2020
Rapid emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a critical challenge worldwide. It is of great importance to understand how AMR is modulated genetically in order to explore new antimicrobial strategies. Recent studies have unveiled that microbial communication systems, which are known to play key roles in regulation of bacterial virulence, are also associated with the formation and regulation of AMR. These microbial cell-to-cell chemical communication systems, including quorum sensing (QS) and pathogen–host communication mechanisms, rely on detection and response of various chemical signal molecules, which are generated either by the microbe itself or host cells, to activate the expression of virulence and AMR genes. This article summarizes the generic signaling mechanisms of representative QS and pathogen–host communications systems, reviews the current knowledge regarding the roles of these chemical communication systems in regulation of AMR, and describes the strategies developed over the years for blocking bacterial chemical communication systems in disease control. The research progress in this field suggests that the bacterial cell-cell communication systems are a promising target not only for disease control but also for curbing the problem of microbial drug resistance. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibiotics; antimicrobial resistance; quorum sensing; host-pathogen communication; quorum quenching antibiotics; antimicrobial resistance; quorum sensing; host-pathogen communication; quorum quenching
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, Y.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, L.-h. The Roles of Microbial Cell-Cell Chemical Communication Systems in the Modulation of Antimicrobial Resistance. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 779. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9110779

AMA Style

Huang Y, Chen Y, Zhang L-h. The Roles of Microbial Cell-Cell Chemical Communication Systems in the Modulation of Antimicrobial Resistance. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(11):779. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9110779

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huang, Ying; Chen, Yufan; Zhang, Lian-hui. 2020. "The Roles of Microbial Cell-Cell Chemical Communication Systems in the Modulation of Antimicrobial Resistance" Antibiotics 9, no. 11: 779. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9110779

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