Next Article in Journal
Bibliometric Analysis of Global Research on Clavulanic Acid
Next Article in Special Issue
Bystander Phage Therapy: Inducing Host-Associated Bacteria to Produce Antimicrobial Toxins against the Pathogen Using Phages
Previous Article in Journal
Silver Nanoparticle Conjugation-Enhanced Antibacterial Efficacy of Clinically Approved Drugs Cephradine and Vildagliptin
Previous Article in Special Issue
Resolving Digital Staphylococcal Osteomyelitis Using Bacteriophage—A Case Report
Open AccessArticle

Fighting Fire with Fire: Phage Potential for the Treatment of E. coli O157 Infection

1
Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2
EpiBiome, Inc., 29528 Union City blvd, Union City, CA 94587, USA
3
Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The author contributed equally to this work.
Antibiotics 2018, 7(4), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics7040101
Received: 23 October 2018 / Revised: 9 November 2018 / Accepted: 14 November 2018 / Published: 16 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacteriophages: Alternatives to Antibiotics and Beyond)
Hemolytic–uremic syndrome is a life-threating disease most often associated with Shiga toxin-producing microorganisms like Escherichia coli (STEC), including E. coli O157:H7. Shiga toxin is encoded by resident prophages present within this bacterium, and both its production and release depend on the induction of Shiga toxin-encoding prophages. Consequently, treatment of STEC infections tend to be largely supportive rather than antibacterial, in part due to concerns about exacerbating such prophage induction. Here we explore STEC O157:H7 prophage induction in vitro as it pertains to phage therapy—the application of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents to treat bacterial infections—to curtail prophage induction events, while also reducing STEC O157:H7 presence. We observed that cultures treated with strictly lytic phages, despite being lysed, produce substantially fewer Shiga toxin-encoding temperate-phage virions than untreated STEC controls. We therefore suggest that phage therapy could have utility as a prophylactic treatment of individuals suspected of having been recently exposed to STEC, especially if prophage induction and by extension Shiga toxin production is not exacerbated. View Full-Text
Keywords: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria; bacteriophage therapy; phage therapy; lysogenic conversion; prophage induction; read recruitment; shiga toxin Antibiotic-resistant bacteria; bacteriophage therapy; phage therapy; lysogenic conversion; prophage induction; read recruitment; shiga toxin
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Howard-Varona, C.; Vik, D.R.; Solonenko, N.E.; Li, Y.-F.; Gazitua, M.C.; Chittick, L.; Samiec, J.K.; Jensen, A.E.; Anderson, P.; Howard-Varona, A.; Kinkhabwala, A.A.; Abedon, S.T.; Sullivan, M.B. Fighting Fire with Fire: Phage Potential for the Treatment of E. coli O157 Infection. Antibiotics 2018, 7, 101.

AMA Style

Howard-Varona C, Vik DR, Solonenko NE, Li Y-F, Gazitua MC, Chittick L, Samiec JK, Jensen AE, Anderson P, Howard-Varona A, Kinkhabwala AA, Abedon ST, Sullivan MB. Fighting Fire with Fire: Phage Potential for the Treatment of E. coli O157 Infection. Antibiotics. 2018; 7(4):101.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Howard-Varona, Cristina; Vik, Dean R.; Solonenko, Natalie E.; Li, Yueh-Fen; Gazitua, M. C.; Chittick, Lauren; Samiec, Jennifer K.; Jensen, Aubrey E.; Anderson, Paige; Howard-Varona, Adrian; Kinkhabwala, Anika A.; Abedon, Stephen T.; Sullivan, Matthew B. 2018. "Fighting Fire with Fire: Phage Potential for the Treatment of E. coli O157 Infection" Antibiotics 7, no. 4: 101.

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop