Next Article in Journal
18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid Induces Metabolic Changes and Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Interactions
Next Article in Special Issue
Mycobacterioses Induced by Mycobacterium abscessus: Case Studies Indicating the Importance of Molecular Analysis for the Identification of Antibiotic Resistance
Previous Article in Journal
Resistance Genes, Plasmids, Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), and Phenotypic Resistance of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) Isolated from Slaughtered Chickens in Burkina Faso
 
 
Article

Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics and Clonal Spread in COVID-19-Positive Patients on a Tertiary Hospital Intensive Care Unit, Czech Republic

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, University Hospital Olomouc, I. P. Pavlova 6, 779 00 Olomouc, Czech Republic
2
Department of Microbiology, University Hospital Olomouc, I. P. Pavlova 6, 779 00 Olomouc, Czech Republic
3
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, Hnevotinska 3, 779 00 Olomouc, Czech Republic
4
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, Hnevotinska 3, 779 00 Olomouc, Czech Republic
5
Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, Hnevotinska 3, 779 00 Olomouc, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marcello Covino
Antibiotics 2022, 11(6), 783; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060783
Received: 12 May 2022 / Revised: 31 May 2022 / Accepted: 1 June 2022 / Published: 8 June 2022
This observational retrospective study aimed to analyze whether/how the spectrum of bacterial pathogens and their resistance to antibiotics changed during the worst part of the COVID-19 pandemic (1 November 2020 to 30 April 2021) among intensive care patients in University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic, as compared with the pre-pandemic period (1 November 2018 to 30 April 2019). A total of 789 clinically important bacterial isolates from 189 patients were cultured during the pre-COVID-19 period. The most frequent etiologic agents causing nosocomial infections were strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae (17%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11%), Escherichia coli (10%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (9%), Burkholderia multivorans (8%), Enterococcus faecium (6%), Enterococcus faecalis (5%), Proteus mirabilis (5%) and Staphylococcus aureus (5%). Over the comparable COVID-19 period, a total of 1500 bacterial isolates from 372 SARS-CoV-2-positive patients were assessed. While the percentage of etiological agents causing nosocomial infections increased in Enterococcus faecium (from 6% to 19%, p < 0.0001), Klebsiella variicola (from 1% to 6%, p = 0.0004) and Serratia marcescens (from 1% to 8%, p < 0.0001), there were significant decreases in Escherichia coli (from 10% to 3%, p < 0.0001), Proteus mirabilis (from 5% to 2%, p = 0.004) and Staphylococcus aureus (from 5% to 2%, p = 0.004). The study demonstrated that the changes in bacterial resistance to antibiotics are ambiguous. An increase in the frequency of ESBL-positive strains of some species (Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae) was confirmed; on the other hand, resistance decreased (Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii) or the proportion of resistant strains remained unchanged over both periods (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecium). Changes in pathogen distribution and resistance were caused partly due to antibiotic selection pressure (cefotaxime consumption increased significantly in the COVID-19 period), but mainly due to clonal spread of identical bacterial isolates from patient to patient, which was confirmed by the pulse field gel electrophoresis methodology. In addition to the above shown results, the importance of infection prevention and control in healthcare facilities is discussed, not only for dealing with SARS-CoV-2 but also for limiting the spread of bacteria. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; bacteria; antibiotics; multidrug resistance COVID-19; bacteria; antibiotics; multidrug resistance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Doubravská, L.; Htoutou Sedláková, M.; Fišerová, K.; Pudová, V.; Urbánek, K.; Petrželová, J.; Röderová, M.; Langová, K.; Mezerová, K.; Kučová, P.; Axmann, K.; Kolář, M. Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics and Clonal Spread in COVID-19-Positive Patients on a Tertiary Hospital Intensive Care Unit, Czech Republic. Antibiotics 2022, 11, 783. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060783

AMA Style

Doubravská L, Htoutou Sedláková M, Fišerová K, Pudová V, Urbánek K, Petrželová J, Röderová M, Langová K, Mezerová K, Kučová P, Axmann K, Kolář M. Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics and Clonal Spread in COVID-19-Positive Patients on a Tertiary Hospital Intensive Care Unit, Czech Republic. Antibiotics. 2022; 11(6):783. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060783

Chicago/Turabian Style

Doubravská, Lenka, Miroslava Htoutou Sedláková, Kateřina Fišerová, Vendula Pudová, Karel Urbánek, Jana Petrželová, Magdalena Röderová, Kateřina Langová, Kristýna Mezerová, Pavla Kučová, Karel Axmann, and Milan Kolář. 2022. "Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics and Clonal Spread in COVID-19-Positive Patients on a Tertiary Hospital Intensive Care Unit, Czech Republic" Antibiotics 11, no. 6: 783. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060783

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop