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Open AccessArticle

Improvement in Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater Using an External Magnetic Inductor

1
Departamento de Química Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Francisco Tomás y Valiente 7, 28049 Madrid, Spain
2
Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM/CSIC, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1508; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111508
Received: 27 September 2019 / Revised: 17 October 2019 / Accepted: 18 October 2019 / Published: 23 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Applications of Magnetic Nanomaterials)
Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) of 12 ± 4 nm diameter are electrochemically synthesized for the adsorption and magnetic harvesting of Cr(VI) from contaminated simulated solutions. The removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous media follows pseudo-second-order kinetics. The adsorption efficiency is evaluated in three different scenarios. In standard conditions, i.e., at room temperature; in a thermal bath working at 60 °C, where the temperature could be considered homogeneous within the solution; and finally, under magnetic induction heating, while adjusting the frequency and magnetic field used to attain the same temperature as in the bath experiments. Two benefits of using a magnetic inductor are demonstrated. First, the removal efficiency is almost doubled in comparison to that of the room temperature experiments, and it is higher by 30% compared to that of the bath setup. At the same time as the adsorption occurs, a redox reaction occurs on the surface of the nanoparticles, and Cr(VI), the predominant species in the contaminated solution, is significantly reduced to Cr(III). Through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it is shown that a greater reduction effect is achieved when working in induction conditions than at room temperature. This is the first time that this synergistic effect using magnetic induction heating has been demonstrated for heavy metal decontamination of wastewater. View Full-Text
Keywords: magnetic inductor; hot spots; magnetic harvesting; water treatment; heavy metals; pollutant; adsorption magnetic inductor; hot spots; magnetic harvesting; water treatment; heavy metals; pollutant; adsorption
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rivera, F.L.; Palomares, F.J.; Herrasti, P.; Mazario, E. Improvement in Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater Using an External Magnetic Inductor. Nanomaterials 2019, 9, 1508.

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