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Article

Laser-Induced Graphene on Additive Manufacturing Parts

1
Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
2
Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 73 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637662, Singapore
3
School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255000, China
4
Global Technology Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Suwon 16677, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010090
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 5 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 11 January 2019
Additive manufacturing (AM) has become more prominent in leading industries. Recently, there have been intense efforts to achieve a fully functional 3D structural electronic device by integrating conductive structures into AM parts. Here, we introduce a simple approach to creating a conductive layer on a polymer AM part by CO2 laser processing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze laser-induced modifications in surface morphology and surface chemistry. The results suggest that conductive porous graphene was obtained from the AM-produced carbon precursor after the CO2 laser scanning. At a laser power of 4.5 W, the lowest sheet resistance of 15.9 Ω/sq was obtained, indicating the excellent electrical conductivity of the laser-induced graphene (LIG). The conductive graphene on the AM parts could serve as an electrical interconnection and shows a potential for the manufacturing of electronics components. An interdigital electrode capacitor was written on the AM parts to demonstrate the capability of LIG. Cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and cyclability testing demonstrated good electrochemical performance of the LIG capacitor. These findings may create opportunities for the integration of laser direct writing electronic and additive manufacturing. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D printing; additive manufacturing; laser direct writing electronics; laser-induced graphene 3D printing; additive manufacturing; laser direct writing electronics; laser-induced graphene
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiao, L.; Chua, Z.Y.; Moon, S.K.; Song, J.; Bi, G.; Zheng, H.; Lee, B.; Koo, J. Laser-Induced Graphene on Additive Manufacturing Parts. Nanomaterials 2019, 9, 90. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010090

AMA Style

Jiao L, Chua ZY, Moon SK, Song J, Bi G, Zheng H, Lee B, Koo J. Laser-Induced Graphene on Additive Manufacturing Parts. Nanomaterials. 2019; 9(1):90. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010090

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiao, Lishi, Zhong Y. Chua, Seung K. Moon, Jie Song, Guijun Bi, Hongyu Zheng, Byunghoon Lee, and Jamyeong Koo. 2019. "Laser-Induced Graphene on Additive Manufacturing Parts" Nanomaterials 9, no. 1: 90. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010090

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