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Open AccessArticle

Insights into the Effects of Pore Size Distribution on the Flowing Behavior of Carbonate Rocks: Linking a Nano-Based Enhanced Oil Recovery Method to Rock Typing

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Abdal Industrial Projects Management Co. (MAPSA), Tehran 1456914477, Iran
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Department of Petroleum Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Azad University, Tehran 1477893855, Iran
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Department of Petroleum Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman 7616913439, Iran
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College of Construction Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130600, China
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Faculty of Civil Engineering, Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden, Germany
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Kalman Kando Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Obuda University, 1034 Budapest, Hungary
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Department of Mathematics, J. Selye University, 94501 Komarno, Slovakia
8
Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang 550000, Vietnam
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 972; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050972
Received: 18 March 2020 / Revised: 23 April 2020 / Accepted: 8 May 2020 / Published: 18 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Nanoparticles for Oil Recovery)
As a fixed reservoir rock property, pore throat size distribution (PSD) is known to affect the distribution of reservoir fluid saturation strongly. This study aims to investigate the relations between the PSD and the oil–water relative permeabilities of reservoir rock with a focus on the efficiency of surfactant–nanofluid flooding as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technique. For this purpose, mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) tests were conducted on two core plugs with similar rock types (in respect to their flow zone index (FZI) values), which were selected among more than 20 core plugs, to examine the effectiveness of a surfactant–nanoparticle EOR method for reducing the amount of oil left behind after secondary core flooding experiments. Thus, interfacial tension (IFT) and contact angle measurements were carried out to determine the optimum concentrations of an anionic surfactant and silica nanoparticles (NPs) for core flooding experiments. Results of relative permeability tests showed that the PSDs could significantly affect the endpoints of the relative permeability curves, and a large amount of unswept oil could be recovered by flooding a mixture of the alpha olefin sulfonate (AOS) surfactant + silica NPs as an EOR solution. Results of core flooding tests indicated that the injection of AOS + NPs solution in tertiary mode could increase the post-water flooding oil recovery by up to 2.5% and 8.6% for the carbonate core plugs with homogeneous and heterogeneous PSDs, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: nanomaterials; pore throat size distribution; mercury injection capillary pressure; interfacial tension; contact angle; enhanced oil recovery; surfactant; nanoparticle nanomaterials; pore throat size distribution; mercury injection capillary pressure; interfacial tension; contact angle; enhanced oil recovery; surfactant; nanoparticle
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rezaei, A.; Abdollahi, H.; Derikvand, Z.; Hemmati-Sarapardeh, A.; Mosavi, A.; Nabipour, N. Insights into the Effects of Pore Size Distribution on the Flowing Behavior of Carbonate Rocks: Linking a Nano-Based Enhanced Oil Recovery Method to Rock Typing. Nanomaterials 2020, 10, 972.

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