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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Novel Antibacterial Composites on Bacterial Biofilms

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Department of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering/Department of Microbial Diseases, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London, NW3 2QG, UK
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Department of Restorative Dentistry, Umm Al-Qura University, College of Dental Medicine, Makkah 24381, Saudi Arabia
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Department of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London NW3 2QG, UK
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Unit of Paediatric Dentistry, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London WC1E 6DE, UK
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Department of Microbial Diseases, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London NW3 2QG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Biomater. 2020, 11(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb11030055
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 23 July 2020 / Accepted: 27 July 2020 / Published: 1 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Interactions with Dental and Medical Materials)
Continuing cariogenic bacterial growth demineralizing dentine beneath a composite filling is the most common cause of tooth restoration failure. Novel composites with antibacterial polylysine (PLS) (0, 4, 6, or 8 wt%) in its filler phase were therefore produced. Remineralising monocalcium phosphate was also included at double the PLS weight. Antibacterial studies involved set composite disc placement in 1% sucrose-supplemented broth containing Streptococcus mutans (UA159). Relative surface bacterial biofilm mass (n = 4) after 24 h was determined by crystal violet-binding. Live/dead bacteria and biofilm thickness (n = 3) were assessed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To understand results and model possible in vivo benefits, cumulative PLS release from discs into water (n = 3) was determined by a ninhydrin assay. Results showed biofilm mass and thickness decreased linearly by 28% and 33%, respectively, upon increasing PLS from 0% to 8%. With 4, 6, and 8 wt% PLS, respectively, biofilm dead bacterial percentages and PLS release at 24 h were 20%, 60%, and 80% and 85, 163, and 241 μg/disc. Furthermore, initial PLS release was proportional to the square root of time and levelled after 1, 2, and 3 months at 13%, 28%, and 42%. This suggested diffusion controlled release from water-exposed composite surface layers of 65, 140, and 210 μm thickness, respectively. In conclusion, increasing PLS release initially in any gaps under the restoration to kill residual bacteria or longer-term following composite/tooth interface damage might help prevent recurrent caries. View Full-Text
Keywords: dental composite; antibacterial; antibiofilm; polylysine dental composite; antibacterial; antibiofilm; polylysine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yaghmoor, R.B.; Xia, W.; Ashley, P.; Allan, E.; Young, A.M. Effect of Novel Antibacterial Composites on Bacterial Biofilms. J. Funct. Biomater. 2020, 11, 55. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb11030055

AMA Style

Yaghmoor RB, Xia W, Ashley P, Allan E, Young AM. Effect of Novel Antibacterial Composites on Bacterial Biofilms. Journal of Functional Biomaterials. 2020; 11(3):55. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb11030055

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yaghmoor, Rayan B.; Xia, Wendy; Ashley, Paul; Allan, Elaine; Young, Anne M. 2020. "Effect of Novel Antibacterial Composites on Bacterial Biofilms" J. Funct. Biomater. 11, no. 3: 55. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb11030055

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