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Project Earthrise: Inspiring Creativity, Kindness and Imagination in Planetary Health

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inVIVO Planetary Health, The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
2
The Institute of Integrative Health, Baltimore, 1407 Fleet St, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
3
Center for Integrative Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
4
The ORIGINS Project, Telethon Kids Institute and University of Western Australia, Perth Children’s Hospital, 15 Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Challenges 2020, 11(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/challe11020019
Received: 1 July 2020 / Revised: 23 August 2020 / Accepted: 1 September 2020 / Published: 4 September 2020
The concept of planetary health blurs the artificial lines between health at scales of person, place and planet. At the same time, it emphasizes the integration of biological, psychological, social and cultural aspects of health in the modern environment. Our grandest challenges in the Anthropocene ultimately stem from human attitudes to each other and to our environment. However, solutions rarely confront the underlying value systems that created these interconnected problems, or the attitudes that perpetuate them. Too often, the dominant focus is on the “worst of human nature”, and devalues or neglects the importance of empathy, kindness, hope, love, creativity and mutual respect—the deeper values that unite, empower and refocus priorities of individuals and groups. Here, we call to normalize more creative, mutualistic approaches—including the perspectives of traditional and indigenous cultures—to positively influence normative value systems. We revisit the power of inspiration with the profound example of the Apollo 8 Earthrise photo which galvanized a fledgling planetary health movement over 50 years ago. Through the inaugural Earth Day that followed, we are reminded that its early organizers were not constrained in how they defined the “environment”. They and their primary speakers were as concerned about value systems as they were about pollution—that we cannot hope to solve our problems without addressing the attitudes that created them in the first place. We explore the ways in which the awe of Earthrise—and the contemporary science of creativity and studies of utopian thinking—might reinvigorate imagination, kindness and mutualism. We revisit the fundamental challenge offered by Pulitzer-Prize-winning microbiologist Rene Dubos and others in the afterglow of the Earthrise photo, and the inaugural Earth Day. This is a question of imagination: What kind of world we want to live in? View Full-Text
Keywords: planetary health; Earthrise; Earth Day; social justice; environmental justice; imagination; hope; creativity; nature; Anthropocene; climate change; utopian thinking; biodiversity; NCDs (non-communicable disease); DOHaD (developmental origins of health and disease); cross-sectoral initiatives planetary health; Earthrise; Earth Day; social justice; environmental justice; imagination; hope; creativity; nature; Anthropocene; climate change; utopian thinking; biodiversity; NCDs (non-communicable disease); DOHaD (developmental origins of health and disease); cross-sectoral initiatives
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MDPI and ACS Style

Logan, A.C.; Berman, S.H.; Berman, B.M.; Prescott, S.L. Project Earthrise: Inspiring Creativity, Kindness and Imagination in Planetary Health. Challenges 2020, 11, 19. https://doi.org/10.3390/challe11020019

AMA Style

Logan AC, Berman SH, Berman BM, Prescott SL. Project Earthrise: Inspiring Creativity, Kindness and Imagination in Planetary Health. Challenges. 2020; 11(2):19. https://doi.org/10.3390/challe11020019

Chicago/Turabian Style

Logan, Alan C.; Berman, Susan H.; Berman, Brian M.; Prescott, Susan L. 2020. "Project Earthrise: Inspiring Creativity, Kindness and Imagination in Planetary Health" Challenges 11, no. 2: 19. https://doi.org/10.3390/challe11020019

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