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Writing a Moral Code: Algorithms for Ethical Reasoning by Humans and Machines

by James McGrath 1,* and Ankur Gupta 2
1
Butler University, Department of Philosophy, Religion, and Classics, 4600 Sunset Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46208, USA
2
Butler University, Department of Computer Science, 600 Sunset Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46208, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2018, 9(8), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9080240
Received: 31 July 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue So Say We All: Religion and Society in Science Fiction)
The moral and ethical challenges of living in community pertain not only to the intersection of human beings one with another, but also our interactions with our machine creations. This article explores the philosophical and theological framework for reasoning and decision-making through the lens of science fiction, religion, and artificial intelligence (both real and imagined). In comparing the programming of autonomous machines with human ethical deliberation, we discover that both depend on a concrete ordering of priorities derived from a clearly defined value system. View Full-Text
Keywords: ethics; Isaac Asimov; Jesus; Confucius; Socrates; Euthyphro; commandments; robots; artificial intelligence; programming; driverless cars ethics; Isaac Asimov; Jesus; Confucius; Socrates; Euthyphro; commandments; robots; artificial intelligence; programming; driverless cars
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McGrath, J.; Gupta, A. Writing a Moral Code: Algorithms for Ethical Reasoning by Humans and Machines. Religions 2018, 9, 240.

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