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Review

The Arid Coastal Wetlands of Northern Chile: Towards an Integrated Management of Highly Threatened Systems

1
Departamento de Biología y Geología, Física y Química Inorgánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Spain
2
Corporación de Investigación y Avance de la Paleontología e Historia Natural de Atacama (CIAHN), Avenida Prat, 58, Caldera 1570000, Chile
3
Centro de Investigaciones Costeras de la Universidad de Atacama (CIC-UDA), Avenida Copayapu 485, Copiapó 1530000, Chile
4
Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas de la Universidad de Atacama (IDICTEC-UDA), Avenida Copayapu 485, Copiapó 1530000, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Tom Spencer
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(9), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9090948
Received: 21 July 2021 / Revised: 24 August 2021 / Accepted: 27 August 2021 / Published: 31 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Wetlands)
The ecological value of coastal wetlands is globally recognized, particularly as biodiversity hotspots, but also as buffer areas because of their role in the fight against climate change in recent years. Most of Chile’s coastal wetlands are concentrated in the central and southern part of the country due to climate conditions. However, northern coastal wetlands go unnoticed despite being located in areas of high water deficit (desert areas) and their role in bird migratory routes along the north–south coastal cordon of South America. This study reviews the current environmental status of the arid coastal wetlands of northern Chile (Lluta, Camarones, Loa, La Chimba, Copiapó, Totoral, Carrizal Bajo) in terms of regulations, management, and future aims. The main natural and anthropogenic threats to these coastal wetlands are identified, as well as the main management tools applied for their protection, e.g., the Nature Sanctuary designation, which allows for the protection of both privately and publicly owned property; and the Urban Wetland, a recently created protection category. View Full-Text
Keywords: coastal wetlands; Atacama Desert; management tools; Ramsar; nature sanctuary coastal wetlands; Atacama Desert; management tools; Ramsar; nature sanctuary
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MDPI and ACS Style

Navarro, N.; Abad, M.; Bonnail, E.; Izquierdo, T. The Arid Coastal Wetlands of Northern Chile: Towards an Integrated Management of Highly Threatened Systems. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9, 948. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9090948

AMA Style

Navarro N, Abad M, Bonnail E, Izquierdo T. The Arid Coastal Wetlands of Northern Chile: Towards an Integrated Management of Highly Threatened Systems. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. 2021; 9(9):948. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9090948

Chicago/Turabian Style

Navarro, Nuria, Manuel Abad, Estefanía Bonnail, and Tatiana Izquierdo. 2021. "The Arid Coastal Wetlands of Northern Chile: Towards an Integrated Management of Highly Threatened Systems" Journal of Marine Science and Engineering 9, no. 9: 948. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9090948

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