Next Article in Journal
Development and Field Evaluation of a Spray Drift Risk Assessment Tool for Vineyard Spraying Application
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Shifting the Paradigm: An Ecological Systems Approach to Weed Management
Open AccessReview

Emerging Challenges for Weed Management in Herbicide-Resistant Crops

1
Department of Plant Soils and Agricultural Systems, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901-6509, USA
2
Department of Plant Biology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901-6509, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2019, 9(8), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9080180
Received: 19 June 2019 / Revised: 28 July 2019 / Accepted: 11 August 2019 / Published: 14 August 2019
Since weed management is such a critical component of agronomic crop production systems, herbicides are widely used to provide weed control to ensure that yields are maximized. In the last few years, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly those that are glyphosate-resistant, and more recently, those with dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid) and 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) resistance are changing the way many growers manage weeds. However, past reliance on glyphosate and mistakes made in stewardship of the glyphosate-resistant cropping system have directly led to the current weed resistance problems that now occur in many agronomic cropping systems, and new technologies must be well-stewarded. New herbicide-resistant trait technologies in soybean, such as dicamba-, 2,4-D-, and isoxaflutole- ((5-cyclopropyl-4-isoxazolyl)[2-(methylsulfonyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methanone) resistance, are being combined with glyphosate- and glufosinate-resistance traits to manage herbicide-resistant weed populations. In cropping systems with glyphosate-resistant weed species, these new trait options may provide effective weed management tools, although there may be increased risk of off-target movement and susceptible plant damage with the use of some of these technologies. The use of diverse weed management practices to reduce the selection pressure for herbicide-resistant weed evolution is essential to preserve the utility of new traits. The use of herbicides with differing sites of action (SOAs), ideally in combination as mixtures, but also in rotation as part of a weed management program may slow the evolution of resistance in some cases. Increased selection pressure from the effects of some herbicide mixtures may lead to more cases of metabolic herbicide resistance. The most effective long-term approach for weed resistance management is the use of Integrated Weed Management (IWM) which may build the ecological complexity of the cropping system. Given the challenges in management of herbicide-resistant weeds, IWM will likely play a critical role in enhancing future food security for a growing global population. View Full-Text
Keywords: agronomic practices; dicamba; glyphosate; glufosinate; isoxaflutole; herbicide resistance; herbicide-resistant crops; mesotrione; non-target site resistance (NTSR); plant growth regulators (PGR); target site resistance (TSR); 2,4-D agronomic practices; dicamba; glyphosate; glufosinate; isoxaflutole; herbicide resistance; herbicide-resistant crops; mesotrione; non-target site resistance (NTSR); plant growth regulators (PGR); target site resistance (TSR); 2,4-D
MDPI and ACS Style

Gage, K.L.; Krausz, R.F.; Walters, S.A. Emerging Challenges for Weed Management in Herbicide-Resistant Crops. Agriculture 2019, 9, 180.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop