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Open AccessArticle

Early Detection of Zymoseptoria tritici in Winter Wheat by Infrared Thermography

1
Tropics and Subtropics Group (440e), Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Universität Hohenheim, Garbenstraße 9, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany
2
State Plant Breeding Institute (720), Universität Hohenheim, Fruwirthstr. 21, 70593 Stuttgart, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2019, 9(7), 139; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9070139
Received: 3 June 2019 / Revised: 18 June 2019 / Accepted: 25 June 2019 / Published: 2 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors Application in Agriculture)
The use of thermography as a means of crop water status estimation is based on the assumption that a sufficient amount of soil moisture enables plants to transpire at potential rates resulting in cooler canopy than the surrounding air temperature. The same principle is applied in this study where the crop transpiration changes occur because of the fungal infection. The field experiment was conducted where 25 wheat genotypes were infected with Zymoseptoria tritici. The focus of this study was to predict the onset of the disease before the visual symptoms appeared on the plants. The results showed an early significant increase in the maximum temperature difference within the canopy from 1 to 7 days after inoculation (DAI). Biotic stress associated with increasing level of disease can be seen in the increasing average canopy temperature (ACT) and maximum temperature difference (MTD) and decreasing canopy temperature depression (CTD). However, only MTD (p ≤ 0.01) and CTD (p ≤ 0.05) parameters were significantly related to the disease level and can be used to predict the onset of fungal infection on wheat. The potential of thermography as a non-invasive high throughput phenotyping technique for early fungal disease detection in wheat was evident in this study. View Full-Text
Keywords: IR imaging; canopy temperature; maximum temperature difference; fungal infection; wheat genotypes IR imaging; canopy temperature; maximum temperature difference; fungal infection; wheat genotypes
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Wang, Y.; Zia-Khan, S.; Owusu-Adu, S.; Miedaner, T.; Müller, J. Early Detection of Zymoseptoria tritici in Winter Wheat by Infrared Thermography. Agriculture 2019, 9, 139.

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