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Article

Assessing Baseline Carbon Stocks for Forest Transitions: A Case Study of Agroforestry Restoration from Hawaiʻi

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Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
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Heʻeia National Estuarine Research Reserve, Kāneʻohe, HI 96744, USA
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University of Hawaiʻi Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
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Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
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School of Life Sciences, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
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Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
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Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi, Heʻeia, HI 96744, USA
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Pacific Bioscience Research Center, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Marco Lauteri, Tommaso La Mantia and Anastasia Pantera
Agriculture 2021, 11(3), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11030189
Received: 1 December 2020 / Revised: 12 February 2021 / Accepted: 19 February 2021 / Published: 25 February 2021
As the extent of secondary forests continues to expand throughout the tropics, there is a growing need to better understand the ecosystem services, including carbon (C) storage provided by these ecosystems. Despite their spatial extent, there are limited data on how the ecosystem services provided by secondary forest may be enhanced through the restoration of both ecological and agroecological functions in these systems. This study quantifies the above- and below-ground C stocks in a non-native secondary forest in Hawaiʻi where a community-based non-profit seeks to restore a multi-strata agroforestry system for cultural and ecological benefits. For soil C, we use the equivalent soil mass method both to estimate stocks and examine spatial heterogeneity at high resolution (eg. sub 5 m) to define a method and sampling design that can be replicated to track changes in C stocks on-site and elsewhere. The assessed total ecosystem C was ~388.5 Mg C/ha. Carbon stock was highest in trees (~192.4 Mg C/ha; ~50% of total C); followed by soil (~136.4 Mg C/ha; ~35% of total C); roots (~52.7 Mg C/ha; ~14% of total C); and was lowest in coarse woody debris (~4.7 Mg C/ha; ~1% of total C) and litter (~2.3 Mg C/ha; <1% of total C). This work provides a baseline carbon assessment prior to agroforest restoration that will help to better quantify the contributions of secondary forest transitions and restoration efforts to state climate policy. In addition to the role of C sequestration in climate mitigation, we also highlight soil C as a critical metric of hybrid, people-centered restoration success given the role of soil organic matter in the production of a suite of on- and off-site ecosystem services closely linked to local sustainable development goals. View Full-Text
Keywords: agroecology; biocultural restoration; soil carbon; ecosystem services; land-use change; equivalent soil mass method; sustainable development agroecology; biocultural restoration; soil carbon; ecosystem services; land-use change; equivalent soil mass method; sustainable development
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MDPI and ACS Style

Melone, A.; Bremer, L.L.; Crow, S.E.; Hastings, Z.; Winter, K.B.; Ticktin, T.; Rii, Y.M.; Wong, M.; Kukea-Shultz, K.; Watson, S.J.; Trauernicht, C. Assessing Baseline Carbon Stocks for Forest Transitions: A Case Study of Agroforestry Restoration from Hawaiʻi. Agriculture 2021, 11, 189. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11030189

AMA Style

Melone A, Bremer LL, Crow SE, Hastings Z, Winter KB, Ticktin T, Rii YM, Wong M, Kukea-Shultz K, Watson SJ, Trauernicht C. Assessing Baseline Carbon Stocks for Forest Transitions: A Case Study of Agroforestry Restoration from Hawaiʻi. Agriculture. 2021; 11(3):189. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11030189

Chicago/Turabian Style

Melone, Angelica, Leah L. Bremer, Susan E. Crow, Zoe Hastings, Kawika B. Winter, Tamara Ticktin, Yoshimi M. Rii, Maile Wong, Kānekoa Kukea-Shultz, Sheree J. Watson, and Clay Trauernicht. 2021. "Assessing Baseline Carbon Stocks for Forest Transitions: A Case Study of Agroforestry Restoration from Hawaiʻi" Agriculture 11, no. 3: 189. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11030189

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