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Open AccessArticle

Assessing Salinity Tolerance in Rice Mutants by Phenotypic Evaluation Alongside Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis

1
Transdisciplinary Science and Engineering Program (Development Science Field), Graduate School for Advanced Science and Engineering, Development Science Field, Hiroshima University, 1-5-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima City, Hiroshima 739-8529, Japan
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Division of Biotechnology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences for Southern Vietnam, 121 Nguyen Binh Khiem Street, District 1, Ho Chi Minh City 71058, Vietnam
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Faculty of Biotechnology, Nguyen Tat Thanh University, 298A-300A Nguyen Tat Thanh Street, Ward 13, District 4, Ho Chi Minh City 72820, Vietnam
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Institute of Applied Research and Development, Hung Vuong University, Viet Tri City 291470, Vietnam
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Faculty of Pharmacy, Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang 550000, Vietnam
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Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang 550000, Vietnam
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Department of Genetic Engineering, Agricultural Genetics Institute, Pham Van Dong Street, Hanoi 122000, Vietnam
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Center for Expert, Vietnam National University of Agriculture, Trau Quy, Gia Lam, Hanoi 131000, Vietnam
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2020, 10(6), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10060191
Received: 24 April 2020 / Revised: 24 May 2020 / Accepted: 24 May 2020 / Published: 27 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture)
Salinity stress is one of the most severe constraints limiting rice production worldwide. Thus, the development of salt-tolerant rice promises to deal with increasing food demand due to climate change effects. This study investigated the salinity tolerance of mutant rice by evaluating phenotype and genotype, using forty-two simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers linked to the salinity tolerance Saltol quantitative trait locus (QTL) in ten cultivars and mutant lines. Results of phenotypic screening showed that the mutant line SKLo/BC15TB and cultivar BC15TB performed salt tolerance, while the mutant line Bao Thai/DT 84 and cultivar DT84DB were sensitive to salt stress. The markers RM 493, RM 562, RM 10748, RM 518, RM 237, and RM 20224 were the most polymorphic in salinity tolerance. Among them, RM 237, RM 10748, and RM 224 showed the highest polymorphism information (PIC = 0.58). This study reveals that the three markers are profitable for classification of salinity tolerance in both cultivar and mutant rice. The mutant line SKLo/BC15TB and cultivar BC15TB were found to be promising candidates for diversity analysis of salt-tolerant rice. Findings of this study are useful for developing new salinity-tolerant rice cultivars towards climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: salinity stress; mutant rice; morphological; SSR markers; genotype; phenotype salinity stress; mutant rice; morphological; SSR markers; genotype; phenotype
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huong, C.T.; Anh, T.T.T.; Tran, H.-D.; Duong, V.X.; Trung, N.T.; Dang Khanh, T.; Dang Xuan, T. Assessing Salinity Tolerance in Rice Mutants by Phenotypic Evaluation Alongside Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis. Agriculture 2020, 10, 191.

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