Next Article in Journal
Evolution of Physico-Chemical Properties, Microbial Biomass and Microbial Activity of an Urban Soil after De-Sealing
Next Article in Special Issue
Animal Welfare Programs in Germany—An Empirical Study on the Attitudes of Pig Farmers
Previous Article in Journal
Equipment Development for Small and Urban Conservation Farming Systems
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mycotoxin Contamination of Selected Organic Enrichment Materials Used in Pig Farming
Article

Influence of Different LED Light Colour Temperatures on the Preference Behaviour of Weaned Piglets

1
Institute of Agricultural and Food Sciences, Department of Animal Husbandry and Ecology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 11, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
2
Bavarian State Office for Agriculture, Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Animal Husbandry, Prof.-Dürrwaechter-Platz 5, 85586 Poing-Grub, Germany
3
Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences, Department of Biometrics and Agricultural Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Karl-Freiherr-von-Fritsch-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
4
Centre for Agriculture Haus Düsse, Ostinghausen, 59505 Bad Sassendorf, Germany
5
Institute for Technical Energy Systems, University of Applied Sciences Bielefeld, Interaktion 1, 33619 Bielefeld, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2020, 10(12), 594; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10120594
Received: 9 November 2020 / Revised: 27 November 2020 / Accepted: 30 November 2020 / Published: 2 December 2020
This study investigates the effect of different LED lighting colour temperatures on the preference behaviour of 4-week-old weaned piglets. A total of 32 piglets were housed in two replications in an experimental pen area with four identically equipped pen compartments connected two by two. Each pen unit offered a compartment set to a colour temperature of 3000 kelvin and another set to 6500 kelvin, at 80 lux during the day. Each piglet could freely choose between the two compartments by using a passageway. Over a period of five weeks, the behaviours “lying”, “eating” and “activity” were video recorded for 72 h during the 1st, 3rd and 5th week of the experiment. The location of the piglet in the pen and its behaviour were determined by using time sampling. In the first week, the piglets preferred the colour temperature of 3000 K to perform all behaviours. In the following weeks this preference decreased. Results also show that feed consumption and soiling of the pens were higher under 6500 K. Pigs can differentiate between the different colour temperatures and use them for different behaviours. This can be used to divide pens into functional areas in order to better suit the behavioural needs of pigs. View Full-Text
Keywords: colour temperature; piglets; preference behaviour; light-emitting diode (LED); pig housing colour temperature; piglets; preference behaviour; light-emitting diode (LED); pig housing
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Götz, S.; Raoult, C.M.C.; Reiter, K.; Wensch-Dorendorf, M.; Werner, D.; von Borell, E. Influence of Different LED Light Colour Temperatures on the Preference Behaviour of Weaned Piglets. Agriculture 2020, 10, 594. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10120594

AMA Style

Götz S, Raoult CMC, Reiter K, Wensch-Dorendorf M, Werner D, von Borell E. Influence of Different LED Light Colour Temperatures on the Preference Behaviour of Weaned Piglets. Agriculture. 2020; 10(12):594. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10120594

Chicago/Turabian Style

Götz, Sven; Raoult, Camille M.C.; Reiter, Klaus; Wensch-Dorendorf, Monika; Werner, Daniel; von Borell, Eberhard. 2020. "Influence of Different LED Light Colour Temperatures on the Preference Behaviour of Weaned Piglets" Agriculture 10, no. 12: 594. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10120594

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop