Next Article in Journal
Predictive Factors Associated with Complications after Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy
Next Article in Special Issue
Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation Enhances Quadriceps Motor Evoked Potential in Healthy Participants: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Study
Previous Article in Journal
The Influence of Hypertensive Therapies on Circulating Factors: Clinical Implications for SCFAs, FGF21, TNFSF14 and TNF-α
Article

The Effects of Adding Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation (tSCS) to Sit-To-Stand Training in People with Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

1
Department of Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 6BT, UK
2
Aspire CREATe, UCL, Stanmore HA7 4LP, UK
3
London Spinal Cord Injury Centre, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore HA7 4LP, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(9), 2765; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092765
Received: 10 July 2020 / Revised: 19 August 2020 / Accepted: 21 August 2020 / Published: 26 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spinal Cord Injury and Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation)
Spinal cord stimulation may enable recovery of volitional motor control in people with chronic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). In this study we explored the effects of adding SCS, applied transcutaneously (tSCS) at vertebral levels T10/11, to a sit-to-stand training intervention in people with motor complete and incomplete SCI. Nine people with chronic SCI (six motor complete; three motor incomplete) participated in an 8-week intervention, incorporating three training sessions per week. Participants received either tSCS combined with sit-to-stand training (STIM) or sit-to-stand training alone (NON-STIM). Outcome measures were carried out before and after the intervention. Seven participants completed the intervention (STIM N = 5; NON-STIM N = 2). Post training, improvements in International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) motor scores were noted in three STIM participants (range 1.0–7.0), with no change in NON-STIM participants. Recovery of volitional lower limb muscle activity and/or movement (with tSCS off) was noted in three STIM participants. Unassisted standing was not achieved in any participant, although standing with minimal assistance was achieved in one STIM participant. This pilot study has shown that the recruitment of participants, intervention and outcome measures were all feasible in this study design. However, some modifications are recommended for a larger trial. View Full-Text
Keywords: human; neuromodulation; neurorehabilitation; non-invasive; spinal cord injury; transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation human; neuromodulation; neurorehabilitation; non-invasive; spinal cord injury; transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Al’joboori, Y.; Massey, S.J.; Knight, S.L.; Donaldson, N.d.N.; Duffell, L.D. The Effects of Adding Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation (tSCS) to Sit-To-Stand Training in People with Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 2765. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092765

AMA Style

Al’joboori Y, Massey SJ, Knight SL, Donaldson NdN, Duffell LD. The Effects of Adding Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation (tSCS) to Sit-To-Stand Training in People with Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(9):2765. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092765

Chicago/Turabian Style

Al’joboori, Yazi, Sarah J. Massey, Sarah L. Knight, Nick d.N. Donaldson, and Lynsey D. Duffell 2020. "The Effects of Adding Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation (tSCS) to Sit-To-Stand Training in People with Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 9: 2765. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9092765

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop