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Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition in Endometriosis—When Does It Happen?
Article

Long-Term Evolution of Quality of Life and Symptoms Following Surgical Treatment for Endometriosis: Different Trajectories for Which Patients?

1
CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service de Chirurgie Gynécologique, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
2
INSERM, CIC 1405, Unité CRECHE, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
3
CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Unité de Biostatistiques (DRCI), 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
4
UMR6602, Endoscopy and Computer Vision Group, Faculté de Médecine, Institut Pascal, Bâtiment 3C, 28 place Henri Dunant, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(8), 2461; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9082461
Received: 24 June 2020 / Revised: 24 July 2020 / Accepted: 30 July 2020 / Published: 31 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Endometriosis and Uterine Fibroids)
Many studies have shown a global efficacy of laparoscopic surgery for patients with endometriosis in reducing painful symptoms and improving quality of life (QoL) in the short and long-term. The aim of this study was to analyze the different trajectories of long-term evolution in QoL and symptoms following surgical treatment for endometriosis, and to identify corresponding patient profiles. This prospective and multicenter cohort study concerned 962 patients who underwent laparoscopic treatment for endometriosis. QoL was evaluated using the Short Form (SF)-36 questionnaire and intensity of pain was reported using a visual analog scale prior to surgery and at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months after surgery. Distinctive trajectories of pain and QoL evolution were identified using group-based trajectory modeling, an approach which gathers individuals into meaningful subgroups with statistically similar trajectories. Pelvic symptom trajectories (models of the evolution of dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and chronic pelvic pain intensity over years) correspond to (1) patients with no pain or pain no longer after surgery, (2) patients with the biggest improvement in pain and (3) patients with continued severe pain after surgery. Our study reveals clear trajectories for the progression of symptoms and QoL after surgery that correspond to clusters of patients. This information may serve to complete information obtained from epidemiological methods currently used in selecting patients eligible for surgery. View Full-Text
Keywords: endometriosis; quality of life; pain; group-based trajectory modeling endometriosis; quality of life; pain; group-based trajectory modeling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Comptour, A.; Lambert, C.; Chauvet, P.; Figuier, C.; Gremeau, A.-S.; Canis, M.; Pereira, B.; Bourdel, N. Long-Term Evolution of Quality of Life and Symptoms Following Surgical Treatment for Endometriosis: Different Trajectories for Which Patients? J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 2461. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9082461

AMA Style

Comptour A, Lambert C, Chauvet P, Figuier C, Gremeau A-S, Canis M, Pereira B, Bourdel N. Long-Term Evolution of Quality of Life and Symptoms Following Surgical Treatment for Endometriosis: Different Trajectories for Which Patients? Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(8):2461. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9082461

Chicago/Turabian Style

Comptour, Aurélie, Céline Lambert, Pauline Chauvet, Claire Figuier, Anne-Sophie Gremeau, Michel Canis, Bruno Pereira, and Nicolas Bourdel. 2020. "Long-Term Evolution of Quality of Life and Symptoms Following Surgical Treatment for Endometriosis: Different Trajectories for Which Patients?" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 8: 2461. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9082461

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