Next Article in Journal
Safety and Efficacy of Second Ahmed Valve Implant in Refractory Glaucoma
Next Article in Special Issue
Role of Lopinavir/Ritonavir in the Treatment of Covid-19: A Review of Current Evidence, Guideline Recommendations, and Perspectives
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Airways 17β-Estradiol as a Biomarker of Severity in Postmenopausal Asthma: A Pilot Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Exploring Sodium Glucose Co-Transporter-2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors for Organ Protection in COVID-19
Open AccessCommentary

Does SARS-CoV-2 Trigger Stress-Induced Autoimmunity by Molecular Mimicry? A Hypothesis

1
Department of Biomedicine, Neuroscience and Advanced Diagnostics (BIND), University of Palermo, 90127 Palermo, Italy
2
Euro-Mediterranean Institute of Science and Technology (IEMEST), 90141 Palermo, Italy
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland at Baltimore-Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET), Baltimore, MD 21202, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(7), 2038; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9072038
Received: 19 May 2020 / Revised: 11 June 2020 / Accepted: 26 June 2020 / Published: 29 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Practice)
Viruses can generate molecular mimicry phenomena within their hosts. Why should severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) not be considered one of these? Information in this short review suggests that it might be so and, thus, encourages research aiming at testing this possibility. We propose, as a working hypothesis, that the virus induces antibodies and that some of them crossreact with host’s antigens, thus eliciting autoimmune phenomena with devasting consequences in various tissues and organs. If confirmed, by in vitro and in vivo tests, this could drive researchers to find effective treatments against the virus. View Full-Text
Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; cell stress; antistress proteins; molecular chaperones; molecular mimicry; crossreactive antibodies SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; cell stress; antistress proteins; molecular chaperones; molecular mimicry; crossreactive antibodies
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cappello, F.; Marino Gammazza, A.; Dieli, F.; Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J. Does SARS-CoV-2 Trigger Stress-Induced Autoimmunity by Molecular Mimicry? A Hypothesis. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 2038.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop