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Endometriosis and the Fallopian Tubes: Theories of Origin and Clinical Implications

1
Centre for Women’s Health Research, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Institute of Life Course and Medical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Member of Liverpool Health Partners, Liverpool L8 7SS, UK
2
Liverpool Women’s NHS Foundation Trust, Member of Liverpool Health Partners, Liverpool L8 7SS, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1905; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061905
Received: 15 May 2020 / Revised: 10 June 2020 / Accepted: 15 June 2020 / Published: 18 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Endometriosis and Uterine Fibroids)
Endometriosis is a common, oestrogen driven chronic condition, where endometrium-like epithelial and stromal cells exist in ectopic sites. At present, no curative treatments are available and the existing evidence for disease progression is conflicting. The pathogenesis is still unknown and evidently complex, as mechanisms of initiation may depend on the anatomical distribution of endometriotic lesions. However, amongst the numerous theories and plethora of mechanisms, contributions of the fallopian tubes (FT) to endometriosis are rarely discussed. The FT are implicated in all endometriosis associated symptomatology and clinical consequences; they may contribute to the origin of endometriotic tissue, determine the sites for ectopic lesion establishment and act as conduits for the spread of proinflammatory media. Here, we examine the available evidence for the contribution of the human FT to the origin, pathogenesis and symptoms/clinical consequences of endometriosis. We also examine the broader topic linking endometriosis and the FT epithelium to the genesis of ovarian epithelial cancers. Further studies elucidating the distinct functional and phenotypical characteristics of FT mucosa may allow the development of novel treatment strategies for endometriosis that are potentially curative. View Full-Text
Keywords: endometriosis; fallopian tubes; pathogenesis; stem cells; ovarian cancer endometriosis; fallopian tubes; pathogenesis; stem cells; ovarian cancer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hill, C.J.; Fakhreldin, M.; Maclean, A.; Dobson, L.; Nancarrow, L.; Bradfield, A.; Choi, F.; Daley, D.; Tempest, N.; Hapangama, D.K. Endometriosis and the Fallopian Tubes: Theories of Origin and Clinical Implications. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1905. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061905

AMA Style

Hill CJ, Fakhreldin M, Maclean A, Dobson L, Nancarrow L, Bradfield A, Choi F, Daley D, Tempest N, Hapangama DK. Endometriosis and the Fallopian Tubes: Theories of Origin and Clinical Implications. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(6):1905. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061905

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hill, Christopher J., Marwa Fakhreldin, Alison Maclean, Lucy Dobson, Lewis Nancarrow, Alice Bradfield, Fiona Choi, Diandra Daley, Nicola Tempest, and Dharani K. Hapangama. 2020. "Endometriosis and the Fallopian Tubes: Theories of Origin and Clinical Implications" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 6: 1905. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061905

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