Next Article in Journal
Prevalence of Elbow Joint Arthritis and Enthesitis in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Previous Article in Journal
Role of Menopausal Transition and Physical Activity in Loss of Lean and Muscle Mass: A Follow-Up Study in Middle-Aged Finnish Women
Open AccessArticle

Major Lipids, Apolipoproteins, and Alterations of Gut Microbiota

1
Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 04514, Korea
2
Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 07804, Korea
3
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 03181, Korea
4
Department of Clinical Research Design and Evaluation, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 03063, Korea
5
Medical Research Institute, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 03181, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(5), 1589; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051589
Received: 10 April 2020 / Revised: 14 May 2020 / Accepted: 21 May 2020 / Published: 23 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Endocrinology & Metabolism)
The gut microbiota has been linked to blood lipids. However, the relationship between the gut microbiome and other lipid markers like apolipoproteins A1 (apoA1) and B (apoB) as well as classical lipid markers in Asians remain unclear. Here, we examined the associations between gut microbial diversity and taxonomic compositions with both apolipoproteins and lipid markers in a large number of Korean patients. The fecal 16S rRNA gene sequencing data from 1141 subjects were analyzed and subjects were categorized into control group (G0) or abnormal group (G1) according to blood lipid measurements. The microbial diversity and several taxa of the gut microbiota were significantly associated with triglyceride, apoA1, and apoB levels, but not with total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The alpha diversity of the gut microbiota was inversely associated with high triglyceride level. Interestingly, G1 of apoA1 showed increased microbial richness and distinct microbial community compared with G0 of apoA1. A high abundance of Fusobacteria and low abundance of Oscillospira were found in the hypertriglyceridemia group. In this large-scale study, we identified associations of gut microbiota with apolipoproteins and classical lipid markers, indicating that the gut microbiota may be an important target for regulating blood lipids. View Full-Text
Keywords: gut microbiota; blood lipid; triglyceride; apolipoprotein; 16S rRNA gut microbiota; blood lipid; triglyceride; apolipoprotein; 16S rRNA
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Yun, K.E.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.-H.; Park, E.; Kim, H.-L.; Chang, Y.; Ryu, S.; Kim, H.-N. Major Lipids, Apolipoproteins, and Alterations of Gut Microbiota. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1589.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop